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TZARA, Tristan (1896-1963, editor). Dada. Number 3. Zürich: by J. Heuberger for Mouvement Dada, December 1918. 2° (340 x 248mm). Illustrations after Arp, Janco, Richter, Segal, and others. (Crease from folding, some fading along edges and along crease, some wear at edges.) Original stapled wrappers, printed in read and black (front wrapper with folding crease nearly completely split, spine nearly completely split, some spotting, some wear along the edges).
TZARA, Tristan (1896-1963, editor). Dada. Number 3. Zürich: by J. Heuberger for Mouvement Dada, December 1918. 2° (340 x 248mm). Illustrations after Arp, Janco, Richter, Segal, and others. (Crease from folding, some fading along edges and along crease, some wear at edges.) Original stapled wrappers, printed in read and black (front wrapper with folding crease nearly completely split, spine nearly completely split, some spotting, some wear along the edges).
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TZARA, Tristan (1896-1963, editor). Dada. Number 3. Zürich: by J. Heuberger for Mouvement Dada, December 1918. 2° (340 x 248mm). Illustrations after Arp, Janco, Richter, Segal, and others. (Crease from folding, some fading along edges and along crease, some wear at edges.) Original stapled wrappers, printed in read and black (front wrapper with folding crease nearly completely split, spine nearly completely split, some spotting, some wear along the edges).

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TZARA, Tristan (1896-1963, editor). Dada. Number 3. Zürich: by J. Heuberger for Mouvement Dada, December 1918. 2° (340 x 248mm). Illustrations after Arp, Janco, Richter, Segal, and others. (Crease from folding, some fading along edges and along crease, some wear at edges.) Original stapled wrappers, printed in read and black (front wrapper with folding crease nearly completely split, spine nearly completely split, some spotting, some wear along the edges).

FIRST EDITION OF THE BEST AND SCARCEST ISSUE OF DADA, containing Tzara's Dada manifesto, ground-breaking typography and layout, and illustrations after Arp, Janco, Richter and others. Andre Breton later described the manifesto as 'violently explosive, proclaiming the rupture between art and logic, and the necessity of a great labour of negation to be undertaken'.

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