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A SWISS JEWELLED ENAMELLED GOLD ZARF
Items which contain rubies or jadeite originating … Read more
A SWISS JEWELLED ENAMELLED GOLD ZARF

GENEVA, CIRCA 1880

Details
A SWISS JEWELLED ENAMELLED GOLD ZARF
GENEVA, CIRCA 1880
of typical form, the pierced foliate sides set with six oval black onyx panels applied with vari-cut diamond stars within diamond-set frames, the chased rim, body and pierced foot with black taille d'épargne enamel scrolls and diaper-work and set at intervals with old-mine cut diamonds and rubies, in associated green leather case
2¼ in. (58 mm.) high (2)
Special notice

Items which contain rubies or jadeite originating in Burma (Myanmar) may not be imported into the U.S. Please be advised that a purchasers inability to import any such item into the U.S. or any other country shall not constitute grounds for non-payment or cancellation of the sale. With respect to items that contain any other types of gemstones originating in Burma (e.g., sapphires), such items may be imported into the U.S., provided that the gemstones have been mounted or incorporated into jewellery outside of Burma and provided that the setting is not of a temporary nature (e.g., a string).

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Lot Essay

Coffee has played an important role in Turkish culture from the Ottoman period through to the present day. The serving and consumption of coffee has had a profound effect on political and social interaction, and on gender and hospitality customs throughout the centuries. Although many of the rituals involving the serving of coffee have now disappeared, coffee has remained an integral part of Turkish culture. As with the serving of tea in China and Japan, the serving of coffee in Turkey was a complex, ritualized process. It was served in small cups without handles, known as fincan, which were placed in holders known as zarflar. The word zarf comes from the Arabic word meaning container or envelope, and their purpose was to protect the cup from damage and also the fingers of the drinker from the hot liquid. Cups were typically made of porcelain, but also of glass and sometimes wood, few examples of which survive. However, because it was the zarf that was more visible, it was typically more elaborated and colourfully ornamented. Swiss boxes and objects, made in Geneva and destined for the markets in Turkey and beyond, were often brightly coloured and of unsual shape with scalloped edges, pierced bodies and set with jewels.

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