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AN EDWARD II SILVER ACORN-KNOP SPOON
THE BENSON COLLECTION (LOTS 301-340)
AN EDWARD II SILVER ACORN-KNOP SPOON

CIRCA 1300

Details
AN EDWARD II SILVER ACORN-KNOP SPOON
CIRCA 1300
The fig-shaped bowl with facetted tapering handle, terminating in a finial cast as an acorn
5¾ in. (14.6 cm.) long
13 dwt. (20 gr.)
Provenance
By tradition found as part of a hoard of spoons in the River Rother, near New Romney, Kent.
Given by the owner of the land to his nephew Major Edward Bacheler Walker (1852-1893) and then by descent to his son
Eric Bacheler Walker (1891-1959), 10 Friend Street, London, E.C.
E. B. Walker, Esq.; Christie's, London, 27 November 1957, lot 100 (£250 to How).
The Benson Collection.
Literature
The Victoria and Albert Museum, Review of the Principal Acquisitions, 1912, p. 7.
Commander G. E. P. How and J. P. How, English and Scottish Silver Spoons, Mediaeval to Late Stuart and Pre-Elizabethan Hallmarks on English Plate, London, 1952, vol. I, p. 354, pl. 2.
Art and Auctions, vol. 1, 1957, p. 546.
D. J. E. Constable, The Benson Collection of Early Silver Spoons, Golden Cross, 2012, pp. 104-105, no. 36.
Exhibited
The Victoria and Albert Museum, 1912-1957, (loaned by Major Edward Bacheler Walker nephew of the owner of the land on which the spoon was discovered).
On loan to the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, 2006-2012.

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Lot Essay

ACORN KNOP SPOONS

The Acorn knop spoon is among the earliest form of post-Roman European spoon known, with examples dating predominantly from the beginning of the 14th century. Their importance to their early owners is shown by their appearance in wills. Timothy Kent in his introduction The Benson Collection of Early Silver Spoons, p. 3 cites the will of John de Halegh, proved in 1351, who bequeathed twelve spoons with 'akernes' to Thomas Taillour. John Botillor, a draper leaves his wife Isabella 'twelve best spoons with gilt acorns.'

THE BENSON 'ROTHER GROUP' SPOONS

This spoon, as well as the two previous lots, are of a form collectively known as the 'Rother Group', after the Rother River where they were believed to have been found. The river is known to have changed course during the winter of 1286-1287, when a great storm blocked its exit to the sea, and it is believed that the spoons were in the river prior to this date. Another spoon from this important group is in the collection of the British Museum (1965.0207.1).

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