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Madrid School, second half of the 17th century
PROPERTY FROM THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART, SOLD TO BENEFIT THE EUROPEAN PAINTINGS ACQUISITIONS FUND
Madrid School, second half of the 17th century

Portrait of a young woman

Details
Madrid School, second half of the 17th century
Portrait of a young woman
oil on canvas
25 x 22 in. (63.5 x 55.9 cm.)
Provenance
Mrs. H.O. (Louisine W.) Havemeyer, New York, by 1908; (+), American Art Association, New York, 10 April 1930, lot 107, as Pantoja de la Cruz ($850 to the following).
Mr. and Mrs. Mansfield Ferry, New York, by whom gifted in 1955 in memory of her husband to
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
Literature
H.O. Havemeyer Collection: Catalogue of Paintings, Prints, Sculpture and Objects of Art, New York, 1931, p. 499, as Claudio Coello.
F. Weitzenhoffer, The Havemeyers: Impressionism Comes to America, New York, 1986, p. 184.
S.A. Stein in Splendid Legacy: The Havemeyer Collection, exhibition catalogue, New York, 1993, pp. 266, 283, 268, no. A424, as 'attributed to Pantoja de la Cruz'.
Exhibited
New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Spanish Paintings from El Greco to Goya, 17 February-1 April 1928, p. 8, no. 49, as Pantoja de la Cruz.
New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Grandeur of Lace, 15 May 1957 (no catalogue).
New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Splendid Legacy: The Havemeyer Collection, 27 March-20 June 1993, no. 424, as attributed to Pantoja de la Cruz.

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Lot Essay

Although once attributed to Juan Pantoja de la Cruz (1553-1608), this painting shows a freer, more painterly technique which is closer to painting in Madrid in the second half of the 17thcentury. The sitter's hairstyle and costume are also consistent with fashions worn toward the end of Philip IV's reign (1621-1665) and during the reign of his son Charles II (1665-1700). During this period, women wore their hair long and abandoned the elaborate ruff. The neckline was lowered, with a band of lace stretched across the upper part of the bodice and shoulders. A large jewelled brooch was often worn in the center of the bodice.

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