Pier Paolo Calzolari (B. 1943)
Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's… Read more
Pier Paolo Calzolari (B. 1943)

1 e 2 giorno come gli orienti sono due...

Details
Pier Paolo Calzolari (B. 1943)
1 e 2 giorno come gli orienti sono due...
candle, chair and neon
dimensions variable
Executed in 1970, this work is number three from an edition of three

This work is accompanied by a photo-certificate signed by the artist.
Provenance
Prearo Editore Collection, Turin.
Franz Pawdetto, Turin.
Acquired from the above by the present owner.
Exhibited
New York, Barbara Gladstone Gallery, Pier Paolo Calzolari, 1988 (illustrated, p. 63).
Paris, Galerie nationale du Jeu de Paume, Pier Paolo Calzolari, 1994 (illustrated, p. 178). This exhibition later travelled to Rivoli, Castello di Rivoli.
Special notice

Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's Resale Right Regulations 2006 apply to this lot, the buyer agrees to pay us an amount equal to the resale royalty provided for in those Regulations, and we undertake to the buyer to pay such amount to the artist's collection agent.

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Alessandro Diotallevi
Alessandro Diotallevi

Lot Essay

As soon as we saw this wonderful installation by Calzolari, of an excellent date, we thought of what had guided us in the choice of other works of Arte Povera, and this seemed to contribute to defining what we had been trying to construct. A highly representative overview of the artistic movement, capable, however, of expressing an ambient atmosphere suited to our own dialectic research, composed of dualistic rhythms between light and shade, lightness and heaviness, pure materiality and magic, hardness and softness. This work by Calzolari has brought a touch of lightness and magic to the part of the house dedicated to the most significant works of Arte Povera. It would have this effect, anyway, in any corner of the house: for its constructive autonomy, for its luminous and equally mysterious linguistic universe, for the apparent randomness of the white chair in the foreground, for the incredible perspicacity of that candle on the chair. The neon writing, arranged in successive rows on the wall, looks like a grid illuminated by the mystery of the words, of which you remember that the orients are two, that there is Picaro’s day and that of reality and, above all, that a day is like four long months of absence. It is a sort of absence/presence that binds us to the work. That we perceive as belonging to it. With two universes that are apparently distinct but intrinsically connected: the luminous writing and the empty chair. But is it really empty? Perhaps in the artist’s mind it isn’t, or perhaps it is our own personal projection on the work, that is set in motion the very moment in which the candle is lit. And undeniably, the lit candle completes the installation in a remarkable way, it gives to it a particular soul, to the extent of making you think that it represents the “light” of someone sitting there, maybe a long time ago, but still clinging to the place with his absence/presence.
Sometimes the collector intersects the intentions of the artist, wants to make the work “his”: what harm is there? The viewer, in his turn, leaves an imprint of his own, which enriches (and modifies) the creative objective. Perhaps that faint light emanating from the candle represents the light that some of us are always seeking to illuminate moments of darkness. If a work is able to evoke this, I believe it has reached the most hidden part of the viewer, penetrating inside him.

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