Browse Lots

Global notice COVID-19 Important notice
ADAMS, Samuel (1722-1803), Signer, Massachusetts. Manuscript letter signed ("Samuel Adams"), WITH 6-LINE AUTOGRAPH POSTSCRIPT SIGNED ("Samuel Adams"), to William Lux (ca. 1730-1778), Boston, 13 May 1774. Informing Lux of Boston's response to the "shutting of the Harbour." 1 page, folio, closed tears at folds near edges. [With:] COOPER, William (1721-1809). Manuscript document signed, ("Wm. Cooper"), as Town Clerk, 13 May 1774. 1 page, 8vo, small splits at folds.
THE PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN 
ADAMS, Samuel (1722-1803), Signer, Massachusetts. Manuscript letter signed ("Samuel Adams"), WITH 6-LINE AUTOGRAPH POSTSCRIPT SIGNED ("Samuel Adams"), to William Lux (ca. 1730-1778), Boston, 13 May 1774. Informing Lux of Boston's response to the "shutting of the Harbour." 1 page, folio, closed tears at folds near edges. [With:] COOPER, William (1721-1809). Manuscript document signed, ("Wm. Cooper"), as Town Clerk, 13 May 1774. 1 page, 8vo, small splits at folds.

Details
ADAMS, Samuel (1722-1803), Signer, Massachusetts. Manuscript letter signed ("Samuel Adams"), WITH 6-LINE AUTOGRAPH POSTSCRIPT SIGNED ("Samuel Adams"), to William Lux (ca. 1730-1778), Boston, 13 May 1774. Informing Lux of Boston's response to the "shutting of the Harbour." 1 page, folio, closed tears at folds near edges. [With:] COOPER, William (1721-1809). Manuscript document signed, ("Wm. Cooper"), as Town Clerk, 13 May 1774. 1 page, 8vo, small splits at folds.

"THE TOWN OF BOSTON IS NOW SUFFERING THE STROKE OF VENGEANCE IN THE COMMON CAUSE OF AMERICA"

Adams writes to fellow revolutionary activist, and Baltimore merchant, William Lux, enclosing the non-importation resolution (included here) adopted at Faneuil Hall in response to the Intolerable Acts. "We have received the copy of an Act of the British Parliament...wherein it appears that the inhabitants of this town have been tryed and condemned and are to be punished by the shutting up of the Harbour and other ways, without their having been even accused of any crime committed by them; for no such crime is alleg'd in the Act." In response to the Boston Tea Party of December 1773, Lord North's ministry passed a barrage of bills to crack down on the unruly Americans: the Boston Port Act, closing the Harbor; the Mass. Govt. Act, making governors crown appointees rather than elected officials; and the Administration of Justice Act, which allowed colonists to be transported and tried in Britain.

"The People receive this edict with indignation," Adams continues. "The Town of Boston is now suffering the Stroke of Vengeance in the Common cause of America. I hope they will sustain the blow with a becoming fortitude; and that the effects of this cruel Act, intended to intimidate and subdue the spirits of all America will by the joynt efforts of all be frustrated." Adams looks for a colony-wide response. "As the very being of every Colony, considered as a free People, depends upon the event, a thought so dishonourable to our brethren cannot be entertained, as that this Town will now be left to struggle alone." More dramatic and disturbing news follows: "General Gage is just arrived here, with a commission to supersede Governor Hutchinson...and that this, if the General shall think proper is to be a Garrison Town. Reports are various and contradictory." In his autograph postscript, Adams writes, "As this Town has not the pleasure of a political Correspondence with any Gentlemen in Maryland," he hopes Lux will spread the Bostonian's news far and wide (Lux would later serve on Maryland's Committee of Correspondence). The enclosed resolution signed by Town Clerk, William Cooper, declares "that it is the opinion of this Town that if the other Colonies came into a joynt resolution to stop all importation from Great Britain...till the Act for blocking up this Harbour be repealed, the same will prove the salvation of North America & her Liberties." The Colonies did act together, convening the First Continental Congress, which met that September in Philadelphia. Two dramatic documents from a key moment in the revolutionary struggle. Together 2 items. (2)

More from Fine Printed Books and Manuscripts including Americana

View All
View All