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Yeong Geol Choi (b. 1968)
This Lot has been sourced from overseas. When au… Read more
Yeong Geol Choi (b. 1968)

Fishing in the Morning 2

Details
Yeong Geol Choi (b. 1968)
Fishing in the Morning 2
signed with artist's signature (lower right)
water color on Korean paper
92 x 167 cm. (36 1/4 x 65 3/4 in.)
Painted in 2009
Special notice

This Lot has been sourced from overseas. When auctioned, such property will remain under “bond” with the applicable import customs duties and taxes being deferred unless and until the property is brought into free circulation in the PRC. Prospective buyers are reminded that after paying for such lots in full and cleared funds, if they wish to import the lots into the PRC, they will be responsible for and will have to pay the applicable import customs duties and taxes. The rates of import customs duty and tax are based on the value of the goods and the relevant customs regulations and classifications in force at the time of import.

Lot Essay

Choi Yeong-Geol sets the task for himself in a search for spiritual meanings by defining the relationship between religion and nature; human and nature. His task is based on his understanding of religion as one of the most compelling influences on moral values, inspiration, and the viewpoint of human beings. The idea of nature and religion as a whole is sacred to Choi as he endeavors to unite all existence by balancing human and nature together by subtly expressing through a snapshot composition to hint a trace of human existence taking a photograph of serene landscapes, yet without disturbing the harmony and balance of nature and spirit.

Fishing In The Morning 2 demonstrates Choi Yeong-Geol's impeccably faithful brushstrokes describing contrary textures between the crashes and surges of whitecaps against the irregular grey rocks, to emulate the phenomenal power of Mother Nature by bringing the viewer close to sensual reality. Typically, Choi extends beyond its sublimity as scented with his affection for humanity and its vulnerability, to exalt the struggle between heavenly perfection and the human experience as a necessary backdrop in presenting the ultimate truth. Choi reminds us that as humans, we are a part of a larger realm or cosmos that we cannot possibly fully comprehend the essence of nature and the ultimate truth, but is the cultivation of interactions, experiences, and appreciation that is held important.

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