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Emilio Amero (Mexican 1901-1976)
Emilio Amero (Mexican 1901-1976)

Abluciones

Details
Emilio Amero (Mexican 1901-1976)
Abluciones
signed 'AMERO' (lower right)
polymer tempera on board
26 x 19¾ in. (66 x 50.2 cm.)
Executed in 1959.

This lot is sold with three preparatory drawings and one lithograph.

b.) Lithograph
signed 'E. AMERO' (lower right)
Image size: 12½ x 10¼ in. (31.8 x 26 cm.)
Executed in 1935.

c.) Preparatory drawing
Green colored pencil on paper
signed 'E. AMERO' (lower right)
Image size: 9 x 7 in. (22.9 x 17.8 cm.)

d.) Preparatory drawing
Red and blue colored pencil on tracing paper
Image size: 12½ x 10 in. (31.8 x 25.4 cm.)

e.) Preparatory drawing
Green colored pencil on paper
signed 'AMERO' (lower right)
Image size: 10½ x 8 in. (26.7 x 20.3 cm.)

Five in one lot.
Provenance
Lowell Dunham, Norman, Oklahoma (acquired directly from the artist).
By descent to Mrs. Lowell Dunham.
Acquired from the above by the present owner.

Lithograph and preparatory sketches acquired by the present owner from Peter Amero, Norman, Oklahoma.
Literature
A. Zúñiga, Emilio Amero: Un modernista liminal, Mexico City, Albedrío, 2008, p. 82 & 217 (illustrated in color); lithograph illustrated p. 167.
Exhibited
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Arts Center, Emilio Amero, 1962.

Brought to you by

Camila Femenias
Camila Femenias

Lot Essay

Working alongside such modernist luminaries as Diego Rivera, David Alfaro Siqueiros and José Clemente Orozco in 1920s Mexico, Emilio Amero became steeped in the aesthetics and ideals of the muralists. Years later, after he had settled in the United States, the artist continued to depict traditional Mexican subjects in a monumentalizing style that demonstrates the enduring influence of Los Tres Grandes. Abluciones, with its two volumetric women who evoke the image of pre-Columbian goddesses rendered in radiant red, is a testament to Amero’s ability to transform the lessons of the muralists into his own distinct artistic vision. For Amero, this vision included not only painting, but printmaking as well. Indeed, Amero dedicated much of his life to both creating prints and establishing schools in New York, Oklahoma and Seattle to further the development of the medium. Printmaking was in fact such an essential part of Amero’s practice that lithographs often formed the basis for his future paintings as is the case with the present work.
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