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A GEORGE IV SILVER SOUP TUREEN AND STAND
A GEORGE IV SILVER SOUP TUREEN AND STAND
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PROPERTY OF A WEST COAST COLLECTOR
A GEORGE IV SILVER SOUP TUREEN AND STAND

ROBERT GARRARD II, LONDON, 1824

Details
A GEORGE IV SILVER SOUP TUREEN AND STAND
ROBERT GARRARD II, LONDON, 1824
The tureen of circular campana form, with one handle formed as a triton blowing a conch shell and the other as a mermaid, the lower body with shellwork, on a base of four entwined dolphins, the domed cover with broad waterleaves surmounted by a crawfish atop celery, vegetables and oysters; the stand formed as a basin of waves edged with seafoam terminating in two stylized nautilus-shell handles, each side engraved with a coat-of-arms and a Baron’s coronet, the cover and finial stamped "1" and the bowl stamped "2", marked under bowl, cover, stand, and on finial, dolphins, interior nuts, and two nuts under stand.
The stand 21 in. (53.3 cm.) long; 462 oz. 10 dwt. (14,389 gr.)
Provenance
Fletcher Norton, 3rd Baron Grantley of Markenfield (1796-1878)
Sotheby’s, New York, 30 April – 1 May, 2003, lot 240

Condition Report

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Lot Essay

PHOTO CAPTIONS:
Fletcher Norton, 3rd Baron Grantley of Markenfield (1796-1878)
By Sir William Beechey, RA
Private Collection

Courtesy, Winterthur Museum,
Tureen and stand by Robert Garrard II, London, England, 1824,
Silver, Campbell Collection of Soup Tureens at Winterthur, 1996.4

The present tureen and its pair, now in the Campbell Collection at the Winterthur Museum, belong to a lavish commission of dining silver ordered from Garrard’s by the 3rd Lord Grantley from 1824 to 1826. This commission included a pair of sculptural candelabra, with male and female Bacchic figures, and a set of six figural salt cellars now at Fairfax House. (See Donald L. Fennimore and Patricia A. Halfpenny, Campbell Collection of Soup Tureens at Winterthur, 2000, pp. 52-53, fig. 24; the candelabra were sold from the Alan and Simone Hartman Collection, Christie’s New York, 20 October, 1999, lot 198.)

This model, described in Garrard’s own ledgers in 1819 as “2 finely chased terrines, stands, with marine figures supported by dolphins” was also produced by Paul Storr in the 1820s (quotation as cited in Joseph R. Bliss, The Jerome and Rita Gans Collection of English Silver on Loan to the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, [1994], p. 206).

Robert Garrard and Paul Storr

Evidence suggests that after Paul Storr left Rundell’s in 1819, he established a connection to another retailer, Garrard’s, a rival firm that went on to succeed Rundell’s as Royal Goldsmith in 1830. John Culme found that Garrard’s actually leased Paul Storr’s workshops some time before November 1822 (Culme, Nineteenth Century Silver, 1977, p. 80). Such an arrangement could explain why the same tureen design made by Garrard’s in 1819 and in 1824 was also produced by Storr in 1821, for the 6th Duke of Devonshire, and in 1822, for a Portuguese nobleman, the Conde de Povoa (Chatsworth Collection, sold Christie’s London, 25 June 1958, lot 24; von Buhlow Collection, sold Sotheby’s New York, 28-29 October, 1988, lot 218).

All these tureens are of the same quality and weight, again suggesting that they originated in the same workshop. The latest known example of the present tureen design by Garrard’s is dated 1827-1829; now in the collection of the Virginia Museum (Bliss, op. cit., pp. 204-207, no. 70). Another use of the triton and mermaid models found on these tureens is found on a centerpiece marked by Paul Storr in 1838 where the figures are freestanding around a central support (Culme, op. cit., illus. p. 146). A pair of candelabra, one marked by Garrard in 1824 and the other by Paul Storr in 1835, further illustrates that these makers shared designs and casting patterns throughout the 1820s and early 1830s. (Christie’s New York, 21 May 2014, lot 93).

Fletcher Norton, 3rd Baron Grantley

Lord Grantley succeeded his uncle to the Barony in 1822, and married in 1825, Charlotte Earle, daughter of the artist Sir William Beechey. Undoubtedly the silver tureens, candelabra, and salt cellars were ordered on the occasion of his marriage. Beechey painted the superb portrait of Grantley illustrated on p. XX.

Lord Grantley was educated at the Military College Sandhurst, and served in the Grenadier Guards in the wars against Napoleon. He fought at the Battle of Quatre Bras and was wounded at Waterloo. He lived at Wonersh, Surrey, and also owned Markenfield Hall, Ripon, a 14th-century manor house that remains one of the most intact English medieval houses today.

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