Lot Content

Global notice COVID-19 Important notice
A PAIR OF VICTORIAN SILVER FOUR-LIGHT CANDELABRA
A PAIR OF VICTORIAN SILVER FOUR-LIGHT CANDELABRA

MARK OF ROBERT GARRARD, LONDON, 1837

Details
A PAIR OF VICTORIAN SILVER FOUR-LIGHT CANDELABRA
MARK OF ROBERT GARRARD, LONDON, 1837
Each on openwork domed base, cast and chased with foliage and rocaille, engraved on three sides with a coat-of-arms within rocaille cartouche, the stems formed as a male bacchic figure, his foot resting on a ewer and with a goat at his side and as a female bacchic figure with a panther at her side, each supporting a putto which supports the detachable branches, each branch cast with fruiting grapevines and with a vine and rocaille cast socket, with a further central socket, each with detachable nozzle, each marked on base, branches, sockets and seven nozzles
33 ¼ in. (84.4 cm.) high
669 oz. 18 dwt. (20,840 gr.)
The arms are those of Long impaling Colquhoun.
Provenance
Purchased in 1997.

Brought to you by

Amelia Walker
Amelia Walker

Check the condition report or get in touch for additional information about this

Condition Report

If you wish to view the condition report of this lot, please sign in to your account.

Sign in
View condition report

Lot Essay

The arms are those of Long impaling Colquhoun almost certainly for Walter Long (1793-1867) of Rood Ashton, Wiltshire and his wife Mary Anne Colquhoun (1800-1856)), second daughter of the Rt. Hon. Archibald Colquhoun (d.1820) of Killermont, Lord Register of Scotland, whom he he married in 1819. The Long family had held land in Wiltshire since the 14th century. Walter Long was educated at Winchester College and Christ Church, Oxford. He served as a major in the Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry and sat as M.P. for North Wiltshire from 1835 until 1865. The family seat of Rood Ashton was built for Long’s father by Jeffrey Wyatt, being completed in 1808. Walter added to the existing house using Thomas Hopper as his architect. Hopper had recently finished his neo-Norman masterpiece Penrhyn Castle in North Wales. The work was finished in 1836. These candelabra, dating from the following year, were no doubt ordered as part of the embellishment of the family seat.

More from A Townhouse off Grosvenor Square: The Collection of Dr. Peter D. Sommer

View All
View All