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A BRONZE FIGURE OF DIANA THE HUNTRESS
A BRONZE FIGURE OF DIANA THE HUNTRESS
A BRONZE FIGURE OF DIANA THE HUNTRESS
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A BRONZE FIGURE OF DIANA THE HUNTRESS

AFTER THE MODEL BY ANSELME FLAMEN (1647-1717), FRENCH, LATE 17TH OR EARLY 18TH CENTURY

Details
A BRONZE FIGURE OF DIANA THE HUNTRESS
AFTER THE MODEL BY ANSELME FLAMEN (1647-1717), FRENCH, LATE 17TH OR EARLY 18TH CENTURY
On an integrally cast plinth
28 1/8 in. (71.5 cm.) high
Provenance
George Durlacher; Christie's, London, 6 April 1938, lot 51.
The Marquis de Gouy d'Arcy, thence by descent.
Christie's, London, 6 July 1993, lot 127.
French & Company; Christie's, New York, 24 November, 1998, lot 57.
Literature
M. Schwartz, ed., European Sculpture from the Abbott Guggenheim Collection, New York, 2008, pp. 178-179, no. 94.

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE:
New York, Knoedler & Co., The French Bronze 1500-1800, 6-27 Nov. 1968, no. 18.
F. Souchal, French Sculptors of the 17th and 18th centuries - The reign of Louis XIV, Oxford, 1977, I, pp. 285-286, figs. 32i-32iii.
A. Gibbon, Bronzes Français du Grand Siècle, Paris, 1985, p.47, figs. 55-56.
Paris, Château de Versailles, Versailles et l’Antique, 13 Nov. 2012 - 17 Mar. 2013, Alexandre Maral ed..
F. Haskell and N. Penny, Taste and the Antique, New Haven and London 1981, pp. 196-8, no. 30, fig. 102.

Condition report

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Lot Essay

The present beautifully finished bronze is derived from a composition by Anselme Flamen (1647-1717), itself based upon an antique marble known as Diana of Versailles. As Haskell and Penny point out (loc. cit.), the marble was first recorded in 1586 in Fontainebleau, but was later moved under Louis XIV to the Grande Galerie at Versailles and finally to the Louvre in 1789. The image depicted here follows a compositional format favored in France, and artists such as Antoine Coysevox, Van Clève and Cayot realized full size marble and versions in bronze.
When the present example of this celebrated bronze was sold Christie's, London, 6 April 1938, it was associated with the circle of Francesco Primaticcio and Germain Pilon. A similar bronze was exhibited at The French Bronze at Knoedler's in 1968 with anonymous attribution, although correctly associated with the 17th century.
François Souchal first recognized the connection between the present bronze and Flamen's marble statue of Diane of 1693-1694, designed for the park at Marly and placed in the centre of the fountain of Diana. The marble was acquired by the Louvre at the sale of the collection the Vicomtesse René Vigier in 1970 (Maral, op. cit., cat. 153, p. 138). The bronze is likely based on a model in wax or terracotta for the marble, and differs from it in various minor respects. A preparatory drawing in Berlin (Souchal, op. cit., p. 285, fig. 32,ii) shows what must be a still earlier conception, in which the goddess held aloft an arrow, as opposed to her bow, and a wild boar's head is nestled at her feet alongside her faithful hound. Most of the marble figures were made in bronze for the decorative market in Paris in the late 17th and early 18th century. The present bronze is known in at least two other casts, one formerly in the Museum at Charleston, South Carolina, the other last recorded in the Pushkin Museum, Moscow, and previously in the Hermitage, St. Petersburg.

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