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David Alfaro Siqueiros (Mexican 1896-1974)
PROPERTY OF THE LOS ANGELES COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART, SOLD TO BENEFIT ACQUISITIONS OF LATIN AMERICAN ART
David Alfaro Siqueiros (Mexican 1896-1974)

Landscape in Blue

Details
David Alfaro Siqueiros (Mexican 1896-1974)
Landscape in Blue
signed and dated 'SIQUEIROS, 6-69' (lower right)
oil on wood board
26 x 40 in. (66 x 101.6 cm.)
Painted in 1969.
Provenance
The Bernard and Edith Lewin Collection of Mexican Art.
Gift from the above.
Literature
Exhibition catalogue, Siqueiros: Paisajista / Siqueiros: Landscape Painter, Mexico City, Editorial RM, 2010, p. 203 (illustrated in color).
Exhibited
Long Beach, Museum of Latin American Art, Siqueiros: Paisajista / Siqueiros: Landscape Painter, 12 September 2010-30 January 2011.

Lot Essay

We are grateful to Dr. Irene Herner Reiss for her assistance cataloguing this work.

This painting demonstrates Siqueiros was pouring and dripping paint freely and sensually since his Experimental Workshop in New York in the mid-1930s to his later works. He experimented with accidents and semi-abstract forms, such as his folding-screens at the Sala de Arte Público Siqueiros, as well as on pieces of acrylic and in several other works like, Explosión solar (1968) and Floresta (1973). In 1969 Siqueiros executed a number of formally reductive and highly colorful paintings, yet there are but a few examples of abstract works like this present work.

Siqueiros coined the phrase “controlled accidents” in the early 1930s as a way to describe his unconscious processes as a creative foundation. Chance was an important part of his work whenever he began to employ a new technique or medium. Thus controlled accidents were a perfectly suited term to describe his experiments with nitrocellulose and in later years with acrylic paint. As Siqueiros observed: “Visual accidents can occur through the direct juxtapositions of several different colors, resulting in the most fantastic and unimaginable details.”

Excerpt from an essay by Dr. Irene Herner Reiss

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