TWO PRINCES ON ELEPHANTS
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TWO PRINCES ON ELEPHANTS

MUGHAL INDIA, CIRCA 1660 WITH LATER ADDITIONS OR MUGHAL STYLE AT KISHANGARH, EARLY 18TH CENTURY

Details
TWO PRINCES ON ELEPHANTS
MUGHAL INDIA, CIRCA 1660 WITH LATER ADDITIONS OR MUGHAL STYLE AT KISHANGARH, EARLY 18TH CENTURY
Transparent pigments, black ink and gold on paper, the two elephants walking to the right, the shah's elephant adorned with gold bells and chains, his tusks with gold mounts, he sits atop holding a large ankus, a prince rides the other elephant behind, a dog walks with them on the foreground, laid down on cream card with large gold speckles, identified in black nasta'liq at top, the reverse with old typed label, inscriptions in devanagari, framed and glazed
Painting 7 x 10in. (17.8 x 25.5cm.); page 11 5/8 x 16.5cm. (29.7 x 41.8cm.)
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Romain Pingannaud
Romain Pingannaud

Lot Essay

The text on the reverse reads: Emperor Jahangeer on Most ferocious Elephant, while on the other female elephant is seated his relative Prince Pervez shah. A dog of the Royal family is runing with the sovereign. This was most probably painted by Maybe Munsur who was a goldsmith as well and favourite to Jahangeer in the pierod [sic] of 16th century.

Although the inscriptions in Persian and in devanagari on the reverse identify the two princes as Jahangir and his son Parviz Shah, they are probably erroneous. The landscape is very similar to Mughal works of the mid-17th century and details of the faces of the two elephants are particularly well executed. A study for a royal lion hunt in a private collection and dated to circa 1660 offers a close comparable for the treatment of the elephants and the landscape (Terence McInerney, Howard Hodgkin, Indian Drawing, London, 1983, cat.36.) It is possible that this painting was at Kishangarh, as suggested by the inscription on its reverse and this work might be an early 18th century copy by a Kishangarh artist of a Mughal original.

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