PALMER, W. (fl. 1766-1798) and J. NEWTON (1759-1844). A NEW TERRESTRIAL GLOBE on which the TRACTS and NEW DISCOVERIES are laid down from the Accurate Observations made by Caps, Cook, Furneux, Phipps . by W. Palmer & J. Newton Published as the Act directs May 9th 1782.
PALMER, W. (fl. 1766-1798) and J. NEWTON (1759-1844). A NEW TERRESTRIAL GLOBE on which the TRACTS and NEW DISCOVERIES are laid down from the Accurate Observations made by Caps, Cook, Furneux, Phipps . by W. Palmer & J. Newton Published as the Act directs May 9th 1782.

Details
PALMER, W. (fl. 1766-1798) and J. NEWTON (1759-1844). A NEW TERRESTRIAL GLOBE on which the TRACTS and NEW DISCOVERIES are laid down from the Accurate Observations made by Caps, Cook, Furneux, Phipps . by W. Palmer & J. Newton Published as the Act directs May 9th 1782.

A 12-inch (30cm) diameter table globe, two sets of twelve hand-coloured engraved half-gores, an applied retailer's cartouche Sold by [G] Ribright at No. 40 [...] the Poultry LONDON, the continents coloured in red, orange, yellow and green, a light varnish, the graduated meridian through Greenwich, another ungraduated meridian colure through the Canary Islands, routes of voyagers marked, Western Australia marked 'New Holland' with 'Diemens Land' as a peninsula, Eastern Canada and America outlined in red, some state borders marked, 'New France' and 'New Louisiana' shaded green with no border to the North, 'New Albion' and 'Mexico' outlined in yellow. (Light soiling and fading of colour, minor rubbing to varnish near equator, very small losses to South Pole, most of applied analemma lost, occasional minor chips and crack to gores consistent with age and use). Supported in a brass graduated meridian ring (lacking hour ring and pointer), the stand comprising of oak horizon ring bearing engraved paper calendrical dial (cracks, staining and chips consistent with age and use) on four turned ebonised wood united with cross-stretchers (old worming).

THE EARLIEST GLOBE BY JOHN NEWTON. Newton was apprenticed to Thomas Bateman, and made his first globe, a pocket globe in partnership with William Palmer in 1783, using Nathaniel Hill's gores (see lot 122). Another issue of that globe, also 1783, dropped the name Palmer, presumably marking an end of their venture together. At the turn of the 19th century, he was located at 97 Chancery Lane, where he was soon joined in business by his second son, William. The firm Newton & Sons would become one of the leading dynasties of globe makers in the 19th century. This table globe of 1782 would appear to be unrecorded and is in very good condition for a Georgian globe by Newton.

Brought to you by

Eugenio Donadoni
Eugenio Donadoni

Check the condition report or get in touch for additional information about this

If you wish to view the condition report of this lot, please sign in to your account.

Sign in
View condition report
;

More from Valuable Books and Manuscripts Including Cartography

View All
View All