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HEVELIUS, Johannes (1611-1687). Selenographia: sive Lunae descriptio; atque Accurata, Tam Macularum eius, addita est, lentes expoliendi nova ratio. Danzig: Andreas Hünefeld for the author, 1647.
HEVELIUS, Johannes (1611-1687). Selenographia: sive Lunae descriptio; atque Accurata, Tam Macularum eius, addita est, lentes expoliendi nova ratio. Danzig: Andreas Hünefeld for the author, 1647.
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HEVELIUS, Johannes (1611-1687). Selenographia: sive Lunae descriptio; atque Accurata, Tam Macularum eius, addita est, lentes expoliendi nova ratio. Danzig: Andreas Hünefeld for the author, 1647.

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HEVELIUS, Johannes (1611-1687). Selenographia: sive Lunae descriptio; atque Accurata, Tam Macularum eius, addita est, lentes expoliendi nova ratio. Danzig: Andreas Hünefeld for the author, 1647.

2° (339 x 212mm). Title printed in red and black. Engraved additional title by Jeremias Falck after Adolf Boÿ with portraits of Alhazen and Galileo, engraved portrait of the author by Falck after Helmich von Iwenhusen the Younger, 108 [of 111] engraved plates by Hevelius, some printed recto and verso, and including 3 double-page plates, 26 illustrations. (Lacking three plates, without the half-title and conjugate blank, some short repaired tears, occasional small marginal dampstain and light spotting.) Modern calf, spine with raised bands, lettered directly in blind, edges sprinkled red, early endpapers preserved. Provenance: Count Czarnecki (engraved bookplate, shelf-mark; sold, Sotheby’s New York, 7 June 1988, lot 143) – Gerald F. Fitzgerald (his sale, Sotheby’s, 14 May 2013, lot 91).

FIRST EDITION OF THE FIRST COMPREHENSIVE LUNAR ATLAS, and Hevelius's first important work, which contains the results of four years' observations from the specially built observatory – once the finest in the world – at his house in Danzig, using instruments of his own construction. Hevelius describes his instruments in detail, recounts his observations of the planets and discusses lunar markings and the movement of libration, an irregularity of the moon's motion. His observations of the lunar eclipse on 4 November 1649 are contained in an appendix between pp.548-549. The Selenographia ends with a description of a mounted lunar globe, ‘perhaps the first of its kind, permitting the representation of librational movements’ (DSB). Many of the names given to lunar features by Hevelius are still in use. The fine engravings depicting his instruments and lunar maps are by his own hand. Brunet III, 150; BYU/Hevelius 1; Cinti 120; Houzeau & Lancaster 1252; Honeyman 1672; Wardington 1030 (same collation for plates and no mention of the plate for eclipses).
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Please note that this lot lacks just two plates (plates 21 and 40), but includes a plate not found in all copies (plate ‘RRR’).

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