Lot Content

Global notice COVID-19 Important notice
A 'TRANSYLVANIAN' DOUBLE-NICHE RUG
A 'TRANSYLVANIAN' DOUBLE-NICHE RUG

WEST ANATOLIA, FIRST HALF 17TH CENTURY

Details
A 'TRANSYLVANIAN' DOUBLE-NICHE RUG
WEST ANATOLIA, FIRST HALF 17TH CENTURY
Even overall wear, heavily corroded black, small scattered repairs
4ft.11in. x 3ft10in. (150cm. x 115cm.)

Brought to you by

Jason French
Jason French

Check the condition report or get in touch for additional information about this

Condition report

If you wish to view the condition report of this lot, please sign in to your account.

Sign in
View condition report

Lot Essay

The so called 'Transylvanian' rugs vary in design, layout and colouring but remain immediately recognisable due to a relatively small range of motifs and colours. Although the majority have provenance that traces them back to Transylvania, it is clear that they are of Anatolian origin, partly because of the lack of any proof of a local production and partly because the structure is consistent with other Anatolian weavings.

Most of the motifs in this group of rugs are of pure Ottoman origin but have an increasing stylisation and angularity of form. One of the largest collections of 'Transylvanian' rugs is found in the Black Church in Brasov and amounts to over 151 pieces woven before the nineteenth century, which indicates that these rugs were not only a symbol of wealth but played an important role in the social history of the period when they were used as gifts or possibly as money for bartering. As the market grew they appear to have been woven in different parts of Turkey such as Ushak, Bergama or Kula and therefore employ a variety of weaving techniques (Marino and Clara Dall'Oglio, 'Transylvanian Rugs - Some Considerations and Opinions', Hali, vol.1, no.3, pp.274-275).

Stefano Ionescu divides the rugs into four different design groups, the largest of which is composed of the double-niche design as seen here, that makes up the largest proportion of those found in regional churches and museums. Their palette consists primarily of reds, blues and yellows in varying tones and their design is always symmetrical along the vertical axis, although one will always find a minute asymmetrical detail in each rug, (Stefano Ionescu, Antique Ottoman Rugs in Transylvania, Rome 2006, p.58). Two comparable rugs that employ the same design and colouring with very slight variations are illustrated by Ferenc Batari, Ottoman Turkish Carpets, Budapest, 1994, pl.53 and 59, p.144.





More from Oriental Rugs and Carpets

View All
View All