A PALE-YELLOW OVERLAY GOLDEN-YELLOW GLASS SNUFF BOTTLE
Items which contain rubies or jadeite originating … Read more
A PALE-YELLOW OVERLAY GOLDEN-YELLOW GLASS SNUFF BOTTLE

POSSIBLY IMPERIAL, PROBABLY PALACE WORKSHOPS, 1760-1850

Details
A PALE-YELLOW OVERLAY GOLDEN-YELLOW GLASS SNUFF BOTTLE
POSSIBLY IMPERIAL, PROBABLY PALACE WORKSHOPS, 1760-1850
The bottle is carved on both sides through the opaque glass overlay to the translucent amber-tone ground with a chi dragon climbing through a bi disc, the narrow sides are also carved with sinuous dragons, all below the neck interior-molded in imitation of a cinched pouch.
2 ¾ in. (7 cm.) high, jadeite stopper
Provenance
John Sinclair, California.
The Edmund Dwyer Collection; Christie's London, 12 October 1987, lot 58.
Asian Art Studio, Los Angeles, California, 2010.
Ruth and Carl Barron Collection, Belmont, Massachusetts, no. 5060.
Special notice

Items which contain rubies or jadeite originating in Burma (Myanmar) may not be imported into the U.S. As a convenience to our bidders, we have marked these lots with Y. Please be advised that a purchaser¹s inability to import any such item into the U.S. or any other country shall not constitute grounds for non-payment or cancellation of the sale. With respect to items that contain any other types of gemstones originating in Burma (e.g., sapphires), such items may be imported into the U.S., provided that the gemstones have been mounted or incorporated into jewellery outside of Burma and provided that the setting is not of a temporary nature (e.g., a string).

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Margaret Gristina
Margaret Gristina

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Lot Essay

This bottle is very similar to one illustrated by Moss, Graham and Tsang in A Treasury of Chinese Snuff Bottles: the Mary and George Bloch Collection, Hong Kong, 2002, Vol. 5, p. 588, no. 956, where it is mentioned that the interior molded detail is 'to create the impression of a fabric pouch. Attributed to the Imperial glassworks, Beijing.' They go on to say that this group of bottles is 'an exceedingly rare type of bottle.'

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