A VERY RARE LACQUERED SOFTWOOD HORSESHOE-BACK ARMCHAIR, QUANYI
This lot is offered without reserve. THE COLLECTION OF ROBERT HATFIELD ELLSWORTH
A VERY RARE LACQUERED SOFTWOOD HORSESHOE-BACK ARMCHAIR, QUANYI

CHINA, QING DYNASTY, SECOND HALF 17TH CENTURY

Details
A VERY RARE LACQUERED SOFTWOOD HORSESHOE-BACK ARMCHAIR, QUANYI
CHINA, QING DYNASTY, SECOND HALF 17TH CENTURY
The chair has a sweeping crest rail supported by the S-shaped splat above a gilt-lacquered reticulated apron, the legs flanked by shaped spandrels on either side of the elaborately carved standing struts, above the soft mat seat set within the rectangular frame, above shaped, beaded aprons and spandrels, the whole embellished in the Japanese manner in gold lacquer with floral scrolls and landscapes in hiramakie and takamakie.
41 in. (104.1 cm.) high, 25 in. (63.5 cm.) wide, 19 in. (48.3 cm.) deep
Special notice

This lot is offered without reserve.

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Michael Bass
Michael Bass

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Lot Essay

The present chair belongs to a very small group of furniture constructed in China and decorated in Japan. Other chairs belonging to this group include a pair from the collection of William Cornelius Van Horne, bequeathed to the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts; and a pair in the Los Angeles County Art Museum gifted by Lynda and Stewart Resnick (M.2013.53.1-.2) and published and exhibited by Nicholas Grindley, ‘November 1999’, cat. No. 10.

The collaboration between Chinese and Japanese craftsmen is somewhat surprising given the official trade ban put in force by the Kangxi government between 1662 and 1683. However, there is evidence of this cooperation between the two nations during this turbulent period as evidenced by the Chinese mother-of-pearl-inlaid lacquer stand bearing a Kangxi-period cyclical date corresponding to 1673, with a decorative theme relating to a Japanese legend, strongly suggesting that it was intended for a Japanese patron, sold at Christie’s Hong Kong, 1 June 2011, lot 3577.

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