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Patek Philippe. A Unique and Very Fine 18K Gold Openface Keyless Lever Pocket Watch with Enamel Miniature after Jacques Louis David by Suzanne Rohr, With Original Certificate of Origin
Patek Philippe. A Unique and Very Fine 18K Gold Openface Keyless Lever Pocket Watch with Enamel Miniature after Jacques Louis David by Suzanne Rohr, With Original Certificate of Origin

SIGNED PATEK PHILIPPE, GENÈVE, REF. 866/10, MOVEMENT NO. 931'909, CASE NO. 433'546, MANUFACTURED IN 1971

Details
Patek Philippe. A Unique and Very Fine 18K Gold Openface Keyless Lever Pocket Watch with Enamel Miniature after Jacques Louis David by Suzanne Rohr, With Original Certificate of Origin
Signed Patek Philippe, Genève, Ref. 866/10, Movement No. 931'909, Case No. 433'546, Manufactured in 1971
Cal. 17-170 nickel-finished lever movement stamped twice with the Geneva seal, 18 jewels, white dial, Roman numerals, outer minute track, subsidiary seconds, plain circular case, snap on back decorated with polychrome painted enamel miniature portrait depicting Alexandre Lenoir and marked J. Louis David, signed and dated S. Rohr 1971, case, dial and movement signed, case and movement numbered
47mm diam.

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Lot Essay

Accompanied by a Patek Philippe Extract from the Archives confirming production of the present watch with the portrait of Alexandre Lenoir in 1971 and its subsequent sale on May 9th, 1980. Further accompanied by original Patek Philippe Certificate of Origin.

Marie Alexandre Lenoir (27 December 1761-11 June 1839) was a self-taught archaeologist who led a campaign to save important monuments, tombs and sculptures from destruction during the French Revolution. In 1793, the National Convention dictated that tombs of kings should be plundered and destroyed and their bones thrown in to a ditch and indeed the royal tombs at Saint-Denis were destroyed. Lenoir sought to save monuments from what he described as revolutionary vandalism. Along with the support of Sylvain Bailly, he was able to have confiscated objects placed in to the Musée des Monuments Français, which opened to the public in 1795. The goal of the museum was to protect not great works of art as would be seen in the Louvre, but sculptures and tomb monuments from the Middle Ages to the early 19th Century. The period was one of turmoil with debate over what constituted legitimate art with eternal aesthetics and those items seen from a purely historical or local perspective. Jacques-Louis David, a friend of Lenoir spoke for the idea of art conservation as seen by works of art at the Louvre, but also creating a statute to the French people based on the feudal debris which included statuary taken from Notre Dame and other churches. Lenoir was the administrator of the museum for 30 years until the museum was closed in 1816 during the Bourbon Restoration.

Jacques-Louis David’s portrait of Alexandre Lenoir was begun in France and completed in Brussels where David went in to exile. It was completed in 1817 and ultimately entered in to the Louvre in 1921.

Jacques-Louis David (30 August 1748 – 29 December 1825) was a leading classicist painter who was a supporter of the French Revolution. He was an influential painter in the Neoclassical style, which moved away from the frivolity of the Rococo period. His early works had an austerity and classicism associated with the Ancien Régime. In later years under the regime of Napoleon I, his works developed in to the Empire style with warmer colors. With the Bourbon Restoration, David left France and went in to exile in Brussels.

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