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GALILEI, Galileo (1564-1642). Istoria e dimostrazioni intorno alle macchie solari e loro accidenti. Rome: Giacomo Mascardi, 1613.
GALILEI, Galileo (1564-1642). Istoria e dimostrazioni intorno alle macchie solari e loro accidenti. Rome: Giacomo Mascardi, 1613.
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GALILEI, Galileo (1564-1642). Istoria e dimostrazioni intorno alle macchie solari e loro accidenti. Rome: Giacomo Mascardi, 1613.

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GALILEI, Galileo (1564-1642). Istoria e dimostrazioni intorno alle macchie solari e loro accidenti. Rome: Giacomo Mascardi, 1613.

4° (224 x 162mm). Printer's woodcut device on title, engraved portrait of Galileo, 38 full-page engravings of sunspots, 5 full-page engravings of Jovian satellites, one engraving and 8 woodcut and typographic diagrams in text. (Lacking A3-A4 containing an address to the reader from Angelo De Filiis, without blank A1, title lightly soiled.) Green morocco by B. Vera, gilt spine and turn-ins, green edges, cloth slipcase. Provenance: ‘N.18’ (inscription on title).

FIRST EDITION OF GALILEO'S FIRST PUBLISHED ENDORSEMENT OF THE COPERNICAN MODEL, ‘Export’ issue without the supplement of Scheiner's letters to Welser. Galileo wrote the Istoria e dimostrazioni in the form of letters to Marcus Welser of Augsburg, arguing that sunspots appeared on the surface of the sun and were not tiny satellites of it. Based on observations of their motion, Galileo concluded that the sun rotated on a fixed axis. The work also includes Galileo's first written account of his observations of the phases of Venus and the mysteries of Saturn. His specific endorsement of the Copernican model foreshadowed many of his later theories and their political and religious consequences: ‘I tell you that this planet also, perhaps no less than horned Venus, agrees admirably with the great Copernican system on which propitious winds now universally are seen to blow...’ (Stillman Drake's translation). The issue with Scheiner's letters and that without were published at the same time; evidently one was for the Italian market where there would be no copyright dispute, and the other issue for export. Since Scheiner was then teaching at Ingolstadt, the printer Mascardi felt free to publish his letters in Italy, but north of the Alps privileges would be infringed. Cinti 43; Dawson 2587; Carli and Favaro 60; Riccardi I, 509 (‘Raro’); Stillman Drake, Galileo at Work 198; Waller 12046.
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