Kenzo Okada (1902 - 1982)
These lots have been imported from outside the EU … Read more Through A Collector's Eye: The Kenzo Kagami Collection of Post-War Japanese Art
Kenzo Okada (1902 - 1982)

A Hut

Details
Kenzo Okada (1902 - 1982)
A Hut
signed Kenzo Okada (lower left)
oil on canvas
181.6 x 176.5 cm.
Painted in 1968
Provenance
Betty Persons Gallery, New York
Literature
The Museum of Modern Art, Toyama, Kenzo Okada, exhibition catalogue, (Japan, 1989), cat. no. 78
The Museum of Modern Art, Gunma and The Museum of Art, Ehime, Through a Collectors Eye: Japanese Art after 1945, exhibition catalogue, (Japan, 2001), cat. no. 22, p. 44
Exhibited
1969: Kenzo Okada Paintings, Betty Persons Gallery, New York
1989: Okada Kenzo ten, The Museum of Modern Art, Toyama, and others
2001 - 2002: Through a Collectors Eye: Japanese Art after 1945, The Museum of Modern Art, Gunma and The Museum of Art, Ehime
Special notice

These lots have been imported from outside the EU for sale using a Temporary Import regime. Import VAT is payable (at 5%) on the Hammer price. VAT is also payable (at 20%) on the buyer’s Premium on a VAT inclusive basis. When a buyer of such a lot has registered an EU address but wishes to export the lot or complete the import into another EU country, he must advise Christie's immediately after the auction.

Brought to you by

Anastasia von Seibold
Anastasia von Seibold

Lot Essay

Kenzo Okada is among the group of Japanese artists that relocated to New York during the 1950s and 1960s, arriving there himself in 1950. Each artist took their own path, with many striving for pure abstraction, however Okada set a precedent for combining Japanese traditions with American abstract trends. Subtly incorporating elements of Japanese culture such as 17th century screen painting and Zen Buddhism, his work evokes the natural world through thoughtfully composed form and muted palette. A Hut, 1968, typifies his oeuvre; quiet, poetic, even meditative - subtle blocks of muted colour drawn from nature, with a geometric form gently hovering within the suggested landscape.

Okada quickly established himself as an integral member of the American art scene and from 1953 he had eleven solo exhibitions at Betty Parsons Gallery, was a US representative at the 1955 Sao Paulo Biennial, and exhibited at the Japanese Pavilion at the 1958 Venice Biennale. His work is in many museum collections including the Guggenheim, New York (go to: https:/www.guggenheim.org/artwork/3313) and The National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto (go to: http:/search.artmuseums.go.jp/search_e/records.php?sakuhin=156136). He died on 25th July, 1982, in Tokyo.

More from Through a Collector's Eye: The Kenzo Kagami Collection of Postwar Japanese Art

View All
View All