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HEISENBERG, Werner (1901-1976) Autograph letter signed (“Werner Hesenberg”) to Joaquin M. LUTTINGER (1923-1997), Cambridge, 3 February 1948. 4 pages, in German, small 4to, in ink with two small drawings, envelope. WITH --HEISENBERG, Werner. Typed letter signed (“W. Heisenberg”) to “Herr Jost and Herr Luttinger” Goettingen, 11 November 1947.2 pages, 4to, in German, torn along folds with chipping affecting text. --LUTTINGER, Joaquin (1923-1997) and Res JOST (1918-1990). Typed letter signed (“J.M. Luttinger” and “Res Jost”) to “Herr Professor” [Heisenberg], Zurich, 29 October 1947. 2 pages, in German, 4to, with ink manuscript corrections. . – Carbon copy to “Prof Heisenberg,” 3 December 1947. One page, in English. 4to. – HEISENBERG, Werner. AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED (“Werner Heisenberg”) to “Herr Luttinger,” -- Carbon copy to “Herr Professor” [Heisenberg], 4 March 1948. 2 pages, in German. 4to.

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HEISENBERG, Werner (1901-1976) Autograph letter signed (“Werner Hesenberg”) to Joaquin M. LUTTINGER (1923-1997), Cambridge, 3 February 1948. 4 pages, in German, small 4to, in ink with two small drawings, envelope. WITH --HEISENBERG, Werner. Typed letter signed (“W. Heisenberg”) to “Herr Jost and Herr Luttinger” Goettingen, 11 November 1947.2 pages, 4to, in German, torn along folds with chipping affecting text. --LUTTINGER, Joaquin (1923-1997) and Res JOST (1918-1990). Typed letter signed (“J.M. Luttinger” and “Res Jost”) to “Herr Professor” [Heisenberg], Zurich, 29 October 1947. 2 pages, in German, 4to, with ink manuscript corrections. . – Carbon copy to “Prof Heisenberg,” 3 December 1947. One page, in English. 4to. – HEISENBERG, Werner. AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED (“Werner Heisenberg”) to “Herr Luttinger,” -- Carbon copy to “Herr Professor” [Heisenberg], 4 March 1948. 2 pages, in German. 4to.

Werner Heisenberg discusses the problem of superconductivity. Heisenberg was famous for his work on quantum theory, and atomic structure as well as his founding of quantum mechanics. He was awarded the 1932 Nobel Prize for physics. In 1947 and 1948 Heisenberg's studies focused on superconductivity. He published two papers on the subject: "Die Übertragung Elektromagnetischer Kräfte im Supraleiter," 1947 and "Das Elektrodynamische Verhaltender Supraleiter," 1948.

In the first letter dated 29 October 1947, Luttinger and Jost refer to the first publication and question whether he can arrive at reliable conclusions regarding the energy conditions: “Demnach glauben wir, dass man aus Ihrer geordnete[n] Phase keine zuverlaessigen Schlusse bezueglich der wirklichen energetischen Verhaeltnisse ziehen darf...” Heisenberg is clarifying his point of view in the two subsequent letters. Heisenberg responds immediately on 11 November 1947 defending his findings. Luttinger and Jost respond to Heisenberg on 3 December 1947: “We have your letter of 11 November but unfortunately are still having difficulties with some of the points discussed. It is, of course, clear to us that your theory does include the fact that the lowest state is currentless: the superconductivity arising from the unusually high density of states with current. It is just our point, however, that such an abnormally high density of states cannot exist…” In his response, dated 3 February 1948, Heisenberg corrects a mistake he made in his response to Luttinger and elaborates more on his theory: “Die Verschiebungen zwischen Strukturen und Elektronengitter haben zunachst nur zur Folge, dass sich das E-Gitter relative zum E.-Gas bewegen muss. Die Gasamstbewegung wird erst festgelegt, wenn auch Gleichgewicht zwischen den Elektronen und dem Ionengitter hergestellt wird.” (“The shift between the structure and the electro-grid have only one result, the E-grid has to move in relation to the e-Gas. The entire movement is first established if also a balance between electro and ion grid is produced.”) The final carbon copy concludes the discussion, mentioning that both Luttinger and Jost had moved on to other projects. It was not until 1958 that the “Theory of Superconductivity” was solved by Leon N. Cooper.
Together, four pieces.

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