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A DANISH TRAY
These lots have been imported from outside the EU … Read more Georg Jensen (1866-1935) Born into a working-class family and trained as a sculptor and silversmith, Georg Jensen was deeply influenced by the Art Nouveau and Arts and Crafts traditions. He originally hoped to pursue a career as a sculptor, but the financial pressures of a young family necessitated a return to the silversmithing trade. In 1904, after a short spell working as a journeyman in the workshops of the Danish Arts and Crafts silversmiths Mogens Ballin (1871-1914), Jensen opened his first shop on a fashionable street in Copenhagen, selling silver jewellery set with semi-precious stones. Much of his inspiration came from nature rather than from traditional historical sources, creating his own stylized interpretations of fruit and flowers to ornament his work. Though Jensen was a genius of silver design in his own right he also promoted the work of other designers to broaden the Jensen style and to push the firm to artistic leadership. The painter Johan Rohde (1856-1935) for example was highly influential in developing the Jensen brand. Another influential designer was Jensen's brother-in-law, Harald Nielsen (1892-1977), responsible for the design of the fish-dish, cover and mazarine (lot 34), who joined the firm as an apprentice in 1909 and became a prolific designer, remaining active until the 1960s. Nielsen was an accomplished draftsman and deeply versed in Rohde's and Jensen's styles. He often fleshed out their sketches to provide finished working drawings for the silversmiths. Georg Jensen viewed his market internationally, with a store in Berlin by 1909 and later Stockholm and Paris in 1918 and London in 1921. While the first store in New York didn't open until 1924, Jensen had already made his name through exhibitions such as the 1915 Pan-Pacific Exposition in San Francisco, where he not only won a Grand Prix but also won the patronage of William Randolph Hearst. Despite winning international acclaim for its designs, the firm struggled financially, leading Jensen to relinquish control by 1924, spending a year in Paris preparing the firm's entry in the 1925 Paris exhibition, before returning to Copenhagen to act as artistic director.
A DANISH TRAY

MARK OF GEORG JENSEN, COPENHAGEN, 1945-1977, DESIGNED BY GEORG JENSEN

Details
A DANISH TRAY
MARK OF GEORG JENSEN, COPENHAGEN, 1945-1977, DESIGNED BY GEORG JENSEN
Oval, with two openwork blossom handles, no. 2E, marked underneath
22 in. (56 cm.) long
Special Notice

These lots have been imported from outside the EU for sale using a Temporary Import regime. Import VAT is payable (at 20%) on the Hammer price. VAT is also payable (at 20%) on the buyer’s Premium on a VAT inclusive basis. Where applicable Customs duty will be charged (per rate specified by HMRC guidance) on the Hammer price and VAT will be payable at 20% on duty. When a buyer of such a lot has registered an EU address but wishes to export the lot or complete the import into another EU country, he must advise Christie's immediately after the auction.

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Giles Forster
Giles Forster

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