A TURQUOISE-SET JEWELLERY SUITE
A TURQUOISE-SET JEWELLERY SUITE
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These lots have been imported from outside the EU … Read more PROPERTY FROM A DISTINGUISHED TRIBAL ART COLLECTION
A TURQUOISE-SET JEWELLERY SUITE

RETAILED BY HAMILTON & CO, CALCUTTA, INDIA, LATE 19TH/EARLY 20TH CENTURY

Details
A TURQUOISE-SET JEWELLERY SUITE
RETAILED BY HAMILTON & CO, CALCUTTA, INDIA, LATE 19TH/EARLY 20TH CENTURY
Comprising a necklace, a pair of earrings, a brooch and a bracelet, each piece set with concentric rows of turquoise stones, the reverse plain, in original fitted box
The bracelet 6 ¾in. (17.2cm.) length
Special notice

These lots have been imported from outside the EU for sale using a Temporary Import regime. Import VAT is payable (at 5%) on the Hammer price. VAT is also payable (at 20%) on the buyer’s Premium on a VAT inclusive basis. When a buyer of such a lot has registered an EU address but wishes to export the lot or complete the import into another EU country, he must advise Christie's immediately after the auction.

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Lot Essay

Turquoise was quite commonly used in Indian jewellery in the 19th century. George Birdwood’s ‘The Industrial Arts of India’ (1880) and S.S. Jacob and T.H. Hendley’s ‘Jeypore Enamels’ (1886), considered two if the most important 19th century publications on Indian crafts, feature several turquoise-set necklaces indicating their popularity. (P. M. Carvalho, Gems and Jewels of Mughal India, Volume XVIII, The Nasser D. Khalili Collection of Islamic Art, London, 2010, p. 121.) There is a North Indian gold necklace with comparable turquoise-set elements strung on seed pearls and dating to circa 1880 in the Nasser D. Khalili Collection (Carvalho, 2010, op. cit., no. 48, p. 121-122.)

Hamilton & Co. were the first British silversmiths to set up business in Calcutta around 1811. Most of their items were produced for British customers. Besides selling silver, they were also known as retailers of luxury items such as carriage clocks, watches, as well as light fittings and cut-glass furniture by F. & C. Osler, a Birmingham based firm who shared a showroom in Calcutta with the silversmiths.

The bracelet bears a Dutch stamp on the reverse which suggests that the suite was probably imported into the Netherlands from India and the gold on the bracelet tested for purity when the suite arrived.

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