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Philip Leslie Hale (1865-1931)
Property from the Estate of Robert A. Mann and the Mann Family
Philip Leslie Hale (1865-1931)

The Rose Tree Girl

Details
Philip Leslie Hale (1865-1931)
The Rose Tree Girl
oil on canvas
40 ¼ x 20 1/8 in. (102.2 x 51.1 cm.)
Painted circa 1922.
Provenance
Ira Spanierman, Inc., New York.
Acquired from the above, 1973.
Exhibited
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Carnegie Institute, Twenty-First Annual International Exhibition of Paintings, April 27-June 15, 1922, no. 86.
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, 118th Annual Exhibition, February 4-March 25, 1923, p. 43, no. 259, illustrated.
Cincinnati, Ohio, Cincinnati Art Museum, The Thirtieth Annual Exhibition of American Art, May 26-July 31, 1923, no. 62.

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Annie Rosen
Annie Rosen

Lot Essay

Philip Leslie Hale was a leading member of the Boston School of Impressionists, along with Edmund Tarbell, Frank Weston Benson, William McGregor Paxton and Joseph De Camp, among others. Following studies at the Art Students League in New York, Hale traveled abroad to Paris in 1887 to study at the Académie Julian. The following summer, he visited Giverny for the first time, finding inspiration in Claude Monet's gardens and the community of American Impressionists living there. Upon his return from France, his art student at the Museum School in Boston described Hale as "an experimenter...He had worked out a great many things about vibrations of color, pointillism...of getting the most colorful effect with the limitations of paint." (as quoted in Philip Leslie Hale, A.N.A. (1865-1931): Paintings and Drawings, exhibition catalogue, Boston, Massachusetts, 1988 p. 5) While he later concentrated on more subtle effects of light in his interiors and portraits, Hale maintained this emphasis on bold colors and Impressionist brushwork for his outdoor subjects for the rest of his career, as exemplified by The Rose Tree Girl.

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