Lynn Chadwick, R.A. (1914-2003)
Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's… Read more
Lynn Chadwick, R.A. (1914-2003)

Watcher

Details
Lynn Chadwick, R.A. (1914-2003)
Watcher
signed and dated 'Chadwick 59.', stamped with the Cera Persa Brotal Mendrisio foundry mark (on the top of the base) and numbered '309 0/6' (on the edge of the base)
bronze with a dark brown and green patina
32 in. (81.3 cm.) high
Provenance
with Marlborough Galleries, London, 1961.
Literature
J.P. Hodin, Chadwick, London, 1961, pl. 27, another cast illustrated.
D. Farr and E. Chadwick, Lynn Chadwick: Sculptor, With A Complete Illustrated Catalogue 1947-2003, Farnham, 2014, p. 179, no. 309, another cast illustrated.
Exhibited
Hanover, Kestner Gesellschaft, Kenneth Armitage: Lynn Chadwick, April - May 1960, no. 64, another cast exhibited: this exhibition travelled to Ulm, Ulmer Museum, May - June 1960; Duisburg, Städtische Kunstmuseum, July - August 1960; Berlin, Haus am Waldsee, August - September 1960; Nuremberg, Städtische Kunstsammlung, October - November 1960; Denmark, Humlebaek, Louisiana Museum, December 1960 - January 1961; Oslo, Göteborgs Konstförening, January - February 1961; and Stockholm, Svea-Galleriet, February - March 1961.
Special notice

Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's Resale Right Regulations 2006 apply to this lot, the buyer agrees to pay us an amount equal to the resale royalty provided for in those Regulations, and we undertake to the buyer to pay such amount to the artist's collection agent.
These lots have been imported from outside the EU for sale using a Temporary Import regime. Import VAT is payable (at 5%) on the Hammer price. VAT is also payable (at 20%) on the buyer’s Premium on a VAT inclusive basis. When a buyer of such a lot has registered an EU address but wishes to export the lot or complete the import into another EU country, he must advise Christie's immediately after the auction.

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Pippa Jacomb
Pippa Jacomb

Lot Essay

‘The series of Watchers stand observant but undemonstrative, sinister, armless beings … they seem to be tensed; waiting, aware that something is going to happen. The tensions arise directly from the sculptor’s treatment of surface. His technique leads him to build an armature, constructed from straight rods, and this becomes the skin as well as the bone of the figure. Everything is thus brought onto the surface, and the network of rigid lines and absence of curves is somehow expressive of a high pitch of nervous intensity, possessed by these strange immobile creatures’ (see A. Bowness, Lynn Chadwick, London, 1962).

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