GIORGIO MORANDI (1890-1964)
Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's… Read more
GIORGIO MORANDI (1890-1964)

Grande natura morta con la lampada a petrolio

Details
GIORGIO MORANDI (1890-1964)
Grande natura morta con la lampada a petrolio
etching, 1930, cream Chine appliqué on Fabriano wove paper, a very good impression of the fifth state (of six), signed in pencil, numbered 11/40, with wide margins, presumably the full sheet, with deckle edges above and at left, pale light-staining, otherwise in good condition

Plate 305 x 362 mm., Sheet 377 x 509 mm.
Literature
Vitali 75
Special notice
Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's Resale Right Regulations 2006 apply to this lot, the buyer agrees to pay us an amount equal to the resale royalty provided for in those Regulations, and we undertake to the buyer to pay such amount to the artist's collection agent.

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Alice L'Estrange
Alice L'Estrange

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Lot Essay

One of Morandi's finest etched works, Grande natura morta con la lampada a petrolio was created in 1930, at the height of the artist's most productive period in printmaking. 1930 was also the year he became Professor of Printmaking at the Academy of Fine Arts, Bologna. This appointment gave him financial security for the rest of his career and allowed him to devote himself almost entirely to his art.

Despite the arrival of revolutionary new printing techniques in the 20th century, Morandi, who was entirely self-taught, always and only used the very traditional and relatively simple technique of etching. Rejecting any innovation, the foundation of his work was the grand tradition of printmaking. Indeed, his mastery of the technique was based on the first treatises on etching, published in the 16th and 17th centuries.

Morandi's rigorous approach of reducing familiar objects to pure geometric forms is reminiscent of Paul Cézanne, whose works he had admired at the Rome Secession of 1914. In a more obvious sense, Grande natura morta con la lampada a petrolio is the artist's own, more classical and lyrical answer to the Cubist arrangements of his contemporaries Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso. Grounded in the tangible and the familiar, Morandi's art more immediately suggests the idea of a fourth dimension or metaphysical realm than the literary, surreal visions of Giorgio de Chirico and Carlo Carrá, with whom he had exhibited the previous year. It is perhaps a testament to the strength of Morandi's artistic vision that he was able to steer his own, highly personal path amongst the many avant-garde influences of his time, in order to produce subtly haunting prints such as the present one.

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