A HUANGHUALI RECESSED-LEG TABLE, PINGTOU'AN
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A HUANGHUALI RECESSED-LEG TABLE, PINGTOU'AN

17TH-18TH CENTURY

Details
A HUANGHUALI RECESSED-LEG TABLE, PINGTOU'AN
17TH-18TH CENTURY
The single-panel top with rounded corners is set within a rectangular frame with molded edge, above a plain, beaded apron and cloud-shaped spandrels with hidden mortise and tenon joining them into the mitered frame of the top. The whole is raised on four gently splayed legs of round section joined by a pair of stretchers decorated with further cloud-shaped spandrels.
32 ½ in. (82.4 cm.) high, 42 ¾ in. (108.5 cm.) wide, 14 5/8 in. (37 cm.) deep
Provenance
James Biddle (1929-2005) Collection, Washington D.C.
Literature
R.H. Ellsworth, Chinese Furniture: Hardwood Examples of the Ming and Early Ch'ing Dynasties, New York, 1971, p. 171, nos. 70 and 70a.
Special notice
Prospective purchasers are advised that several countries prohibit the importation of property containing materials from endangered species, including but not limited to coral, ivory and tortoiseshell. Accordingly, prospective purchasers should familiarize themselves with relevant customs regulations prior to bidding if they intend to import this lot into another country.

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Lot Essay

Recessed-leg tables of this type were produced with either straight or raised ends and of varying lengths, which makes them highly versatile. Its form also represents one of the most successful designs in classical Chinese furniture, with their visually pleasing proportions achieved through simple and clean structure further enhanced by elegantly carved cloud-shaped spandrels. It is noteworthy that the master craftsman who created this table paid enormous attention to small details in that all of the tenons in both the long and short sides are hidden, and most unusually, the framing rails and transverse stretchers of the underside are finished with beaded edges.

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