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A PAIR OF PALE BEIGE-GROUND SILK EMBROIDERED PANELS
A PAIR OF PALE BEIGE-GROUND SILK EMBROIDERED PANELS
A PAIR OF PALE BEIGE-GROUND SILK EMBROIDERED PANELS
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PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE NORTH CAROLINA COLLECTION
A PAIR OF PALE BEIGE-GROUND SILK EMBROIDERED PANELS

18TH CENTURY

Details
A PAIR OF PALE BEIGE-GROUND SILK EMBROIDERED PANELS
18TH CENTURY
The first is woven with a lady with hair fastened with a phoenix pin seated at a trestle-leg table holding a brush in her right hand and securing the painting with her right, with a boy beside her reading and an attendant in the foreground. The other is similarly decorated with the lady at a painting table beside three attendants. Both are set in landscapes of various trees and blue-outlined rocks, and finely embroidered in shades of green, brown, blue and yellow, with some details in black ink.
45 ½ in. (115.5 cm) x 19 ¾ in. (50.2 cm) including frames
Sale room notice
Please note that the dimensions should read: 45 ½ in. (115.5 cm) x 19 ¾ in. (50.2 cm) including frames.

Condition report

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Lot Essay

The fine quality of the present pair of panels can be compared to a Kangxi-period embroidered panel depicting the farewell of two lovers, illustrated in The Complete Collection of Treasures of the Palace Museum - 52 - Embroidered Pictures, Hong Kong, 2005, no. 51. The Palace Museum embroidery has similar trees, clouds and blue-shaded rocks as are found on the present panel. The pagoda depicted in the Palace Museum panel shows fine attention to detail, such as the mountains decorating the outside of the balcony, and the screen in the distance of the back of the pagoda: this level of detail is similar to the faux marble depicted on the painting table on one of the present panels. This similarly detailed workmanship suggests that the present panels also date to the early 18th century, and were also made in the Imperial workshops. The present panels are also similar to a group of eight Qianlong-period embroideries, also in the collection of the Palace Museum, Beijing, illustrated ibid., no. 54. This group of panels have sinewy clouds and thickly-outlined blue rocks similar to those on the present panels.

The present panels also bear resemblance to the Gu Family embroideries from the 17th-18th centuries, particularly in the inspiration they take from the subtleties of Chinese panting. The subtle shading found in the rocks and fine silk thread found in the present panels are also characteristic of Gu Family embroideries. Compare the Gu Family embroidered silk panel sold at Christie’s New York, 17-18 March 2016, lot 1386.

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