A ROYAL COPENHAGEN PORCELAIN 'FLORA DANICA' DINNER SERVICE
A ROYAL COPENHAGEN PORCELAIN 'FLORA DANICA' DINNER SERVICE
1 More
PROPERTY OF A NEW YORK LADY
A ROYAL COPENHAGEN PORCELAIN 'FLORA DANICA' DINNER SERVICE

20TH CENTURY, BLUE WAVE AND GREEN PRINTED MARKS, VARIOUS SHAPES, PATTERN NO. 20

Details
A ROYAL COPENHAGEN PORCELAIN 'FLORA DANICA' DINNER SERVICE
20TH CENTURY, BLUE WAVE AND GREEN PRINTED MARKS, VARIOUS SHAPES, PATTERN NO. 20
Each finely painted with a botanical specimen, identified in Latin on the underside, comprising:
Eighteen pierced chargers, shape no. 3527
Eighteen dinner plates, shape no. 3549
Eighteen pierced luncheon plates, shape no. 3553 and 3554
Eighteen two-handled soup cups and stands, shape no. 3612
Eighteen salad/dessert plates, shape no. 3573
Eighteen bread and butter plates, shape no. 3552
Eighteen cups and saucers, shape no. 3513
One oval dish, shape no. 3537
11 ¾ in. (30 cm.) diameter, the chargers

Brought to you by

The Collector
The Collector

Check the condition report or get in touch for additional information about this

If you wish to view the condition report of this lot, please sign in to your account.

Sign in
View condition report

Lot Essay

In the wake of the successful experiments across Europe to recreate the precious porcelain imported from East Asia, in 1775 the Royal Danish Porcelain Manufactory (later the Royal Copenhagen factory) was founded by the chemist and mineralogist Frantz Heinrich Müller. Supported by Queen Dowager Juliane Marie and her heir presumptive Frederik, Hereditary Prince of Denmark, the factory remained under the direct ownership of the Royal family until 1868, when it passed into private hands.
The celebrated ‘Flora Danica’ pattern was originally intended as a gift from the Danes to Catherine the Great of Russia, but the Empress passed away before the service was finished. Upon its completion in 1802, the Danish royal family decided to keep the service, and it was first used to celebrate the birthday of King Christian VII in 1803. Characterized by finely-painted studies of the indigenous flora and fauna of Denmark, with the Latin titles beautifully inscribed to the obverse, ‘Flora Danica’ is still held in the highest regard and considered amongst the most luxurious of dinnerware available today.

More from The Collector: English & European 18th & 19th Century Furniture, Ceramics, Silver & Works of Art

View All
View All