Keith Haring (1958-1990)
These lots have been imported from outside the EU … Read more
Keith Haring (1958-1990)

Untitled

Details
Keith Haring (1958-1990)
Untitled
signed, inscribed and dated 'K. Haring JUN 14-84 MILANO' (on the reverse)
acrylic on paper
27 ½ x 39 3/8in. (70 x 100cm.)
Executed in 1984
Provenance
Salvatore Ala, Milan.
Gladstone Gallery, New York.
Acquired from the above by the present owner.
Special notice

These lots have been imported from outside the EU for sale using a Temporary Import regime. Import VAT is payable (at 5%) on the Hammer price. VAT is also payable (at 20%) on the buyer’s Premium on a VAT inclusive basis. When a buyer of such a lot has registered an EU address but wishes to export the lot or complete the import into another EU country, he must advise Christie's immediately after the auction.

Brought to you by

Paola Saracino Fendi
Paola Saracino Fendi

Lot Essay

Untitled, June 14, 1984 is a buoyant and expressive early work from the celebrated graffiti artist Keith Haring. Painted in 1984, the work marks Haring’s international ascent: that year, he was included in the 42nd Venice Biennale as well as in several traveling exhibitions at institutions including the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Musée d’Art Modern de la Ville de Paris, and the Montreal Museum of Contemporary Art, among others. In autumn of 2019, Haring will have his first major solo exhibition in the United Kingdom at Tate, Liverpool. The present work brims with the artist’s iconic figures that dance across a bright white ground. Outlined in vivid red, they are arrested in the moment of an ecstatic transformation. Haring first gained recognition for his street art, much of which was created surreptitiously in New York City’s subway tunnels. His spirited, animated forms are distinguished by their simplified lines and cheerful colour palette, but their apparent optimism belies the social commentary of the works themselves. Haring was a political activist and within these seemingly playful compositions, he explored questions around capitalism, sexuality and, later, the AIDS epidemic. As writer Ingrid Sischy reflected, ‘there’s an undeniable humanity in his unindividuated little people; at their best, in fact, they seem infused with the essential spirit of life’ (I. Sischy, ‘Kid Haring’, Vanity Fair, July 1997, https://archive.vanityfair.com/article/1997/07/01/kid-haring).

More from Post-War and Contemporary Art Day Auction

View All
View All