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A GOLD FILIGREE INKWELL, NIB-HOLDER, AND TWO CIRCULAR BOXES
A GOLD FILIGREE INKWELL, NIB-HOLDER, AND TWO CIRCULAR BOXES
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These lots have been imported from outside the EU … Read more THE PROPERTY OF A LADY
A GOLD FILIGREE INKWELL, NIB-HOLDER, AND TWO CIRCULAR BOXES

PROBABLY BATAVIA, JAVA, EARLY 19TH CENTURY

Details
A GOLD FILIGREE INKWELL, NIB-HOLDER, AND TWO CIRCULAR BOXES
PROBABLY BATAVIA, JAVA, EARLY 19TH CENTURY
Comprising a circular inkwell, the central holder with separate ceramic pot and conical filigree lid; a cylindrical nib-holder; two cylindrical lidded boxes, the larger with a monogram on the lid, the smaller containing five gaming counters depicting different armorial crests; and a wallet flap en suite
The inkwell 3 ¾in. (9.5cm.) diam.
Special notice

These lots have been imported from outside the EU for sale using a Temporary Import regime. Import VAT is payable (at 5%) on the Hammer price. VAT is also payable (at 20%) on the buyer’s Premium on a VAT inclusive basis. When a buyer of such a lot has registered an EU address but wishes to export the lot or complete the import into another EU country, he must advise Christie's immediately after the auction.

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Louise Broadhurst
Louise Broadhurst

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Lot Essay

The majority of these pieces are certainly made en suite with each other, without doubt for a European royal patron, even though the purpose of the ensemble is not clear. The crowned W on top of the larger box is very clear, and there are further letters W around the sides of the same box. The stylised armorial bearing on the circular counters is also clear. The sides of the inkwell have worked a Maltese cross into the design, while the wallet flap has a similarly worked five-pointed star, similar to that of the Legion d’Honneur. It is highly likely that this ensemble was made for King William I of the Netherlands (r.1815-1840). He used the monogram of a W below the Dutch crown, and founded the most important order of chivalry in Holland, the Military order of William, whose emblem is a Maltese cross. During his reign, through his concentration on creating wealth, the Dutch colonies prospered considerably; the present lot could well have been all or part of a gift intended for or given to him at the time.

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