[FIRST OPIUM WAR]. Manuscript log of the steamer Nemesis, opening off Ningbo and closing off Calcutta [East China Sea and elsewhere], 1 January 1842–28 February 1843.
[FIRST OPIUM WAR]. Manuscript log of the steamer Nemesis, opening off Ningbo and closing off Calcutta [East China Sea and elsewhere], 1 January 1842–28 February 1843.
[FIRST OPIUM WAR]. Manuscript log of the steamer Nemesis, opening off Ningbo and closing off Calcutta [East China Sea and elsewhere], 1 January 1842–28 February 1843.
[FIRST OPIUM WAR]. Manuscript log of the steamer Nemesis, opening off Ningbo and closing off Calcutta [East China Sea and elsewhere], 1 January 1842–28 February 1843.
3 More
No VAT on hammer price or buyer's premium.
[FIRST OPIUM WAR]. Manuscript log of the steamer Nemesis, opening off Ningbo and closing off Calcutta [East China Sea and elsewhere], 1 January 1842–28 February 1843.

Details
[FIRST OPIUM WAR]. Manuscript log of the steamer Nemesis, opening off Ningbo and closing off Calcutta [East China Sea and elsewhere], 1 January 1842–28 February 1843.

c.195 written pages, 337 x 270mm, daily entries recording the date, location of the Nemesis, wind direction and further ‘Remarks’ covering military manoeuvres, ship maintenance and the weather. Original reversed calf. [With:] ‘Nemesis in China’, commonplace book, c.1841-c.1844, chiefly containing transcripts from letters and other documents from naval officers and other officials relating to the actions of HCS Nemesis in China, alongside newspaper cuttings reporting the same.

The ship’s log of the Nemesis – or ‘devil ship’, as she was known in China during the First Opium War – the first British iron-clad warship. The log opens in January 1842, mid-way through the Nemesis’ active service in China under Captain William Hutcheon Hall, with the steamer off the coast of Ningbo; after some small expeditions, the first significant action recorded in the manuscript comes at Taisam on 8 March, where the author sights ‘a fleet of large boats crowded with Chinese Troops with Banners flying’ and as the British forces draw near ‘the Chinese troops who had all left the Junks offered fire on them from […] Matchlocks’; the skirmish is won by the British, ‘upwards of 60 [Chinese troops] were killed and many severely wounded’, houses and junks were set alight and prisoners taken, and a military chest containing a reported two thousand dollars was seized. The log continues, tracking the movements of one of the most feared British vessels plying the seas during the First Opium War, first back to her base at Chusan and then onwards; she aided the British victory at the Battle of Chapu, witnessing ‘the town of Chapoo being taken & the Gates garrisoned by our Troops; the Enemy having fled in all directions’ (18 May). She later docks in Hong Kong (3 December 1842), Canton [Guangzhou] and Macau, before sailing for Singapore and then Calcutta; after the First Opium War, the Nemesis was employed to suppress piracy in Indonesia and the Philippines.

For a detailed account of the career of the Nemesis see Narrative of the voyages and services of the Nemesis, from 1840 to 1843 (London, 1844).
Special notice

No VAT on hammer price or buyer's premium.

Brought to you by

Nicholas Lambourn
Nicholas Lambourn

Check the condition report or get in touch for additional information about this

If you wish to view the condition report of this lot, please sign in to your account.

Sign in
View condition report
;

More from China Trade Paintings: Selections from the Kelton Collection

View All
View All