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A ROMAN MARBLE VENUS PONTIA-EUPLOIA
A ROMAN MARBLE VENUS PONTIA-EUPLOIA
A ROMAN MARBLE VENUS PONTIA-EUPLOIA
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A ROMAN MARBLE VENUS PONTIA-EUPLOIA
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A ROMAN MARBLE VENUS PONTIA-EUPLOIA

CIRCA 1ST CENTURY A.D.

Details
A ROMAN MARBLE VENUS PONTIA-EUPLOIA
CIRCA 1ST CENTURY A.D.
35 in. (89 cm.) high
Provenance
Jean-Claude Roussel (1922-1972), acquired circa 1960 from Maison Carlhian for his property at Chaumont-sur-Tharonne, France; thence by descent.
Vente de l'Entier Contenu d'une Propriété de Chasse - Chaumont-sur-Tharonne, Jean Havin, Argent-sur-Sauldre, 27 January 2018, lot 292.
Special Notice

This lot will be removed to Christie’s Park Royal. Christie’s will inform you if the lot has been sent offsite. Our removal and storage of the lot is subject to the terms and conditions of storage which can be found at Christies.com/storage and our fees for storage are set out in the table below - these will apply whether the lot remains with Christie’s or is removed elsewhere. Please call Christie’s Client Service 24 hours in advance to book a collection time at Christie’s Park Royal. All collections from Christie’s Park Royal will be by pre-booked appointment only. Tel: +44 (0)20 7839 9060 Email: cscollectionsuk@christies.com. If the lot remains at Christie’s it will be available for collection on any working day 9.00 am to 5.00 pm. Lots are not available for collection at weekends.

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Lot Essay

This version of the goddess Venus, known from about twenty ancient replicas, is traditionally associated with the epithets Pontia (of the sea) and Euploia (fair voyage). According to Vermuele and Brauer (Stone Sculptures, The Greek, Roman and Etruscan Collections of the Harvard University Art Museums, p. 50-51), the original is traditionally thought to be from the time of Praxiteles, circa 350 B.C., and may have stood in a temple by the sea.

Very few of the remaining sculptures preserve the original veiled head; the most complete examples, as well as this present lot, include the example in the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen, Dresden (inv. Hm 318) and the Venus from Ince Blundell Hall, now in Liverpool and which wears a diadem and the dolphin support, confirming that the type represents Venus rather than a nymph (see no. 599 in Delivorrias, "Aphrodite" in LIMC). The type was also appropriated by the Romans for private portraiture; see the example in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, with a Trajanic portrait, no. 71 in Schmidt, "Venus" in LIMC.

The upper part of the goddess's body is naked with a loose mantle around her hips and legs, pulled up over her head, accentuating the sinuous curve of her body, particularly noticeable on her back. The drapery has some dramatic folds below the left arm and traces of her right hand remain on her hip. The Roman examples of this type would most likely have been used to decorate a bath or a gymnasium.

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