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Peter Fischli (b. 1952) & David Weiss (1946-2012)
These lots have been imported from outside the EU … Read more PROPERTY FROM A DISTINGUISHED PRIVATE EUROPEAN COLLECTION
Peter Fischli (b. 1952) & David Weiss (1946-2012)

Animal

Details
Peter Fischli (b. 1952) & David Weiss (1946-2012)
Animal
polyurethane, cheesecloth and paint
22 x 38 x 23in. (55.8 x 96.5 x 58.4cm.)
Executed in 1986
Provenance
Sonnabend Gallery, New York.
Acquired from the above by the present owner in 1989.
Literature
Peter Fischli and David Weiss: In a Restless World, exh. cat., Minneapolis, Walker Art Center, 1996, p. 127 (another version illustrated, pp. 56-57).
J. Deitch (ed.), Monument to Now: The Dakis Joannou Collection, Athens 2004, p. 113 (illustrated in colour, p. 114).
R. Fleck, B. Sontgen and A.C. Danto, Peter Fischli David Weiss, London 2005 (another version illustrated in colour, p. 85).
Fischli & Weiss Flowers & Questions. A Retrospective, exh. cat., London, Tate Modern, 2006, p. 78 (another version illustrated, p. 82).
K. Marta, N. McClister and E. Michaelidi (eds.), DESTE 33 Years: 1983-2015, Athens 2015 (illustrated in colour, pp. 134-135; installation views illustrated in colour, pp. 185 and 325; installation views illustrated, p. 136).
Peter Fischli David Weiss : How to Work Better, 2016, exh. cat., New York, The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, p. 71 (another version illustrated in colour, p. 74; installation view illustrated in colour, pp. 72 and 77).
Exhibited
New York, Sonnabend Gallery, Stiller Nachmittag, 1986.
Athens, House of Cyprus, Psychological Abstraction, 1989 (illustrated, pp. 23 and 50).
Thessaloniki, Harbor Storehouse A, Eliminating the Atlantic, 1990 (installation view illustrated, pp. 8-9).
Athens, House of Cyprus, Post-Human, 1992-1993.
Athens, "The Factory", Athens School of Fine Arts, Everything That's Interesting is New: Works from the Dakis Joannou Collection, 1996 (illustrated in colour, p. 99).
Cyprus, Nicosia Municipal Arts Center, Forever, 2001-2002.
Turin, Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Investigations of a Dog. Works from the FACE Collections, 2009-2011, p. 43 (illustrated on the cover and p. 42). This exhibition later travelled to Cascais, Ellipse Foundation; Paris, La maison rouge-Fondation Antoine de Galbert; Stockholm, Magasin 3 Stockholm Konsthall and Athens, DESTE Foundation.
Geneva, Museum of Art and History of Geneva, Urs Fischer - False Friends, 2016, p. 117 (illustrated in colour, p. 39).
Special Notice

These lots have been imported from outside the EU or, if the UK has withdrawn from the EU without an agreed transition deal, from outside of the UK for sale and placed under the Temporary Admission regime. Import VAT is payable at 5% on the hammer price. VAT at 20% will be added to the buyer’s premium but will not be shown separately on our invoice.

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Tessa Lord
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Lot Essay

Created for their first New York solo show at Sonnabend Gallery in 1986, Animal is a charming work from Fischli & Weiss’s seminal series of ‘Grey Sculptures’. With their distinctive humour and philosophical intent, the Swiss duo bring an amiable creature to life. Fischli & Weiss worked together for over three decades until David Weiss’s death in 2012, ranging across disciplines including video, photography, artists’ books, installations, and sculpture. Often engaging with ordinary objects, they combined an ethnographic scrutiny of the everyday with a sense of childlike joy in art’s transformative magic. Animal is one of three unique versions of this sculpture, the other two of which were included in Fischli & Weiss’s major retrospectives at the Tate Gallery, London (2006-7) and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (2016). It is a totemic, benevolent presence, carrying the aura of an idol or ritual artefact. The hollow body is formed of polyurethane and cloth and painted a stony grey. Its features are highly schematic, reduced to four stocky legs, an ovoid abdomen and a round, mask-like face. Nine apertures indicate the eyes, mouth, nostrils, ears and rear, following human anatomical principles. Like the other ‘Grey Sculptures’, it seems to be something like a platonic object: the metaphysical idea of an animal, refined to its most fundamental form. It also shares with the rest of the series – like Equilibrium Organ (Ear), a model of the human inner ear canal, Tube, a simple conduit, and the architectural model of Furnished Apartment – an interest in interior space. The viewer of Animal, as Nancy Spector and Nan Trotman note, ‘can peer into either end of this charmingly rotund creature in order to read the light-filled inverse of the opposite orifice, one of which shows an almost human countenance. The hollow volume inside the work becomes, therefore, a charged sculptural space’ (N. Spector and N. Trotman, ‘Peter Fischli and David Weiss: Work’, in Peter Fischli David Weiss: How to Work Better, exh. cat. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York 2016, p. 71).

The New York debut of Animal followed several years of success in Europe, where Fischli & Weiss had first made a major impact in 1981 with Plötzlich diese Übersicht (Suddenly This Overview), a group of over two hundred small, figurative sculptures in unfired grey clay. They depicted scenes from the monumental to the mundane: flashpoints of ancient history, climactic cultural moments, clichéd vignettes, stories from the Bible and episodes from the artists’ own lives. At once crude, intimate and refreshingly unpretentious, this playful survey of our times proposed a new vision of sculpture and catapulted the duo to fame. Animal shares the quietly radical wit of Suddenly This Overview, transforming its seemingly anodyne or empty form into a resonant chamber of reflection. Gazing into the creature, the viewer might see a version of their own visage staring back at them as light streams through its face. Entry, exit, interior and exterior are brought into new conversation. With gleeful sleight of hand, Fischli & Weiss have made a sculpture that does not confront us in space but invites us in, allowing us, perhaps, to look inside ourselves.

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