Lot Content

Global notice COVID-19 Important notice
A SOUTH ITALIAN GILTWOOD AND 'MECCA' (GILT-VARNISHED SILVER) THRONE CHAIR
A SOUTH ITALIAN GILTWOOD AND 'MECCA' (GILT-VARNISHED SILVER) THRONE CHAIR
1 More
Please note this lot will be moved to Christie’s F… Read more
A SOUTH ITALIAN GILTWOOD AND 'MECCA' (GILT-VARNISHED SILVER) THRONE CHAIR

NAPLES OR SICILY, CIRCA 1720-1730

Details
A SOUTH ITALIAN GILTWOOD AND 'MECCA' (GILT-VARNISHED SILVER) THRONE CHAIR
NAPLES OR SICILY, CIRCA 1720-1730
Of unusually large size, the cartouche form back and serpentine seat covered in red velvet and with arched foliate scrolled cresting with a Classical mask and issuing floral and fruiting garlands flanked by out-scrolled arms supported by C-scrolls, the apron with diapered panels flanking a cabochon, cabriole legs joined by scrolled stretchers, losses to carving and gilt surfaces, wax seal with the Savoy coat-of-arms to the webbing, now detached
80 ½ in. (204.5 cm.) high
Special notice

Please note this lot will be moved to Christie’s Fine Art Storage Services (CFASS in Red Hook, Brooklyn) at 5pm on the last day of the sale. Lots may not be collected during the day of their move to Christie’s Fine Art Storage Services. Please consult the Lot Collection Notice for collection information. This sheet is available from the Bidder Registration staff, Purchaser Payments or the Packing Desk and will be sent with your invoice.

Brought to you by

Victoria Tudor
Victoria Tudor

Check the condition report or get in touch for additional information about this

Condition report

If you wish to view the condition report of this lot, please sign in to your account.

Sign in
View condition report

Lot Essay

The abundant carving and monumental proportions suggest that the lot offered here was made for a member of the upper nobility or a high-ranking member of the Church. This armchair shares many similarities with a number of comparable Neapolitan examples illustrated in E. Colle, Il Mobile Rococò in Italia, Milan, 2003, pp. 62-63 and pp. 82-83, such as the undulating shaped upholstered back, the shell motif on the stretcher, the robust terminals of the armrests, and the flower garlands wrapping around the frame of the backrest. The examples cited by Colle are mostly thrones for ecclesiastical purposes as indicated by the various religious devices in the reserves of the cresting of the backrest, such painted images of saints and attributes of the Catholic Church. The lack of such imagery on the lot offered here suggests that this armchair was not intended for use by the high clergy but rather a member of the upper aristocracy. The female mask issuing a flowering shell motif centering the cresting of the back is comparable to those decorating a giltwood lectern also of Neapolitan manufacture, see ibid. p. 67. Similar armchairs produced in Naples and Sicily during the first quarter of the eighteenth century are still very conventionally Baroque with their square seats and low relief carving, see E. Colle, Il Mobile Barocco in Italia, Milan, 2000, pp. 44-45. Given the presence of what appears to be the Savoy coat of arms on the webbing of this chair (now detached), it is interesting to note that the House of Savoy ruled Sicily from 1713-1720.

More from Dalva Brothers: Parisian Taste In New York

View All
View All