A CARVED AND PAINTED OTTOMAN WOODEN CEILING
This lot is offered without reserve. Specifed lots… Read more
A CARVED AND PAINTED OTTOMAN WOODEN CEILING

TURKEY, 16TH OR FIRST HALF 17TH CENTURY

Details
A CARVED AND PAINTED OTTOMAN WOODEN CEILING
TURKEY, 16TH OR FIRST HALF 17TH CENTURY
Of square form, the inner square section with a geometric design of separate polygonal panels partly moulded and painted with floral designs in colours and gold around five fluted gold bosses, set into a larger square panel of hexagons formed by applied beading, each containing a gold rosette on red ground, the inner and outer flat borders painted with typical Ottoman meandering floral designs, some areas of restoration and retouching, particularly in borders, reinforced from behind
106in. (270cm.) square
Special notice

This lot is offered without reserve.
Specifed lots (sold and unsold) marked with a filled square ( ¦ ) not collected from Christie’s, 8 King Street, London SW1Y 6QT by 5.00 pm on the day of the sale will, at our option, be removed to Crown Fine Art (details below). Christie’s will inform you if the lot has been sent ofsite. If the lot is transferred to Crown Fine Art, it will be available for collection from 12.00 pm on the second business day following the sale. Please call Christie’s Client Service 24 hours in advance to book a collection time at Crown Fine Art. All collections from Crown Fine Art will be by prebooked appointment only.

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Louise Broadhurst
Louise Broadhurst

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Lot Essay

A number of Ottoman Turkish ceilings use the device of a central highly decorated area surrounded by lesser ornamentation, as is seen here. One of the most dramatic examples of this is the seventeenth century ceiling of a house, the Muradiyye, in Bursa (Aslanapa, 1971, pl.249 and p.331). Although the central panel there is hexagonal, the general composition, and in particular the treatment of the surrounding area, is very comparable to that seen here. The surround is made of pine boards overlaid by light ribs forming a hexagonal lattice, the centre of each hexagon filled with a rosette. As here also, the border is one which can be found in various decorative arts of the time including Iznik pottery.

An Ottoman ceiling of very similar proportions, but of slightly earlier date and with more detailed work particularly in the surrounding area, was sold in these Rooms 10 October 2000, lot 312. The centre of the present ceiling has many similarities with that one, notably the eight-pointed raidating stars worked into a geometric lattice, centred on octagonal panels which form a counterpoint with the raised stellar bosses.

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