A CARVED ZITAN CORNER-LEG TABLE
A CARVED ZITAN CORNER-LEG TABLE
A CARVED ZITAN CORNER-LEG TABLE
A CARVED ZITAN CORNER-LEG TABLE
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Please note this lot will be moved to Christie’s F… Read more PROPERTY OF A DIRECT DESCENDANT OF THE CHINESE IMPERIAL FAMILY
A CARVED ZITAN CORNER-LEG TABLE

LATE QING DYNASTY

Details
A CARVED ZITAN CORNER-LEG TABLE
LATE QING DYNASTY
Of simianping ('four-corner-flush') form, the paneled top is set within a rectangular frame above aprons and spandrels ornately carved with nine bats amidst dense cloud scroll. The whole is raised on thick, beaded legs of square section terminating in large scroll feet joined by archaistic scroll-form stretchers.
33 in. (83.8 cm.) high, 62 ¼ in. (158.6 cm.) wide, 25 ½ in. (64.7 cm.) deep
Provenance
Heir Presumptive (Da A Ge) Aixinjueluo Pujun (1885-1942).
Gift to Aixinjueluo Yuyue (1910-1964), son of the First Rank Defender General Aixinjueluo Puzhuan (1875-1920), and thence by descent within the family.
Special notice

Please note this lot will be moved to Christie’s Fine Art Storage Services (CFASS in Red Hook, Brooklyn) at 5pm on the last day of the sale. Lots may not be collected during the day of their move to Christie’s Fine Art Storage Services. Please consult the Lot Collection Notice for collection information. This sheet is available from the Bidder Registration staff, Purchaser Payments or the Packing Desk and will be sent with your invoice.

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Lot Essay


A zitan table of similar form and motif, but larger in size (191. 5 cm. wide), dated to mid Qing dynasty, previously in the collection of Zhu Jiajin (1914-2003) and subsequently donated to the Palace Museum, Beijing , is illustrated by Hu Desheng, Gu gong bo wu yuan cang Ming Qing gong ting jia ju da guan (The Palace Museum Collection: A Treasury of Ming and Qing Dynasty Palace Furniture), vol. 1, Beijing, 2006, pp. 224-225, pl. 252. Hu noted that the table was one of a set of four, and though called a painting table, it was is mostly used for display purposes. However, Zhu Jiajin, the original owner of the table and a former expert on Chinese Furniture at the Palace museum, also illustrated an identical table, which might be either one of the four tables in the original set, in Ming Qing shi nei chen she (Ming and Qing Interior Furnishings), Beijing, p.185, pl.179, where the table is shown in situ as a desk in the studio of his family’s residence.
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