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Grandma Moses (1860-1961)
Grandma Moses (1860-1961)
Grandma Moses (1860-1961)
Grandma Moses (1860-1961)
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Grandma Moses (1860-1961)

The Old Oaken Bucket in 1800

Details
Grandma Moses (1860-1961)
The Old Oaken Bucket in 1800
signed 'Moses. ©' (lower left)–inscribed with title, dated 'November 1, 1943' and numbered '464' (on a label affixed to the reverse)
oil on masonite
21 ¾ x 29 ¾ in. (61 x 71.1 cm.)
Painted in 1943.
Provenance
Private collection, New York.
Parke-Bernet, 27 March 1952, lot 167, sold by the above.
Mr. Shirley C. Burden, New York, by 1973.
By descent to the present owner.
Literature
O. Kallir, Grandma Moses, New York, 1973, p. 292, no. 299, illustrated.

Brought to you by

William Haydock
William Haydock

Lot Essay

This work, painted on November 1, 1943, was assigned number 299 by the artist and entered into her record book on page 24. The copyright for this picture is reserved to Grandma Moses Properties, Co., New York.

Jane Kallir writes, "Like many of Moses' early subjects, the Old Oaken Bucket combines local lore and personal experience. In 1877, young Anna Mary worked as a hired girl for an elderly woman, Mrs. David Burch. Mrs. Burch told Anna Mary that the well on her farm was the original well that had inspired the famous song, 'The Old Oaken Bucket.'" (Grandma Moses in the 21st Century, Alexandria, Virginia, 2001, p. 172)

Samuel Woodworth's beloved poem The Old Oaken Bucket was set to music by George Kiallmark in 1826. The present painting embodies the nostalgic lyrics revolving around a country well: "The wide-spreading pond, and the mill which stood by it,/The bridge, and the rock where the cataract fell,/The cot of my father, the dairy-house nigh it,/The old oaken bucket—the iron-bound bucket/The moss-covered bucket, which hung in the well."

Kallir continues, "'The Old Oaken Bucket' was one of Grandma Moses' best-loved subjects. After she was awarded the New York State Prize for her first rendition of the theme (Kallir 94) in 1941, she received many requests to repeat the work. Always ready to oblige, she honored these requests, though no two versions of the painting are the same." (Grandma Moses in the 21st Century, p. 172)

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