Lot Content

Global notice COVID-19 Important notice
A COMPOSITE RUG FORMED OF A RARE SAFAVID TABRIZ CARPET BORDER
A COMPOSITE RUG FORMED OF A RARE SAFAVID TABRIZ CARPET BORDER
A COMPOSITE RUG FORMED OF A RARE SAFAVID TABRIZ CARPET BORDER
3 More
A COMPOSITE RUG FORMED OF A RARE SAFAVID TABRIZ CARPET BORDER
6 More
Specifed lots (sold and unsold) marked with a fill… Read more
A COMPOSITE RUG FORMED OF A RARE SAFAVID TABRIZ CARPET BORDER

NORTH WEST PERSIA, SECOND HALF 16TH CENTURY

Details
A COMPOSITE RUG FORMED OF A RARE SAFAVID TABRIZ CARPET BORDER
NORTH WEST PERSIA, SECOND HALF 16TH CENTURY
Consisting of a number of sections of the same carpet stitched together, touches of tint, yellow guard stripe rewoven, unevenly worn
6ft.3in. x 4ft.2in. (193cm. x 131cm.)
Provenance
Formerly in the Arhan Collection, Sweden
Literature
P.R.J.Ford, The Persian Carpet Tradition, London, 2018, p.188-9, fig.209
Special Notice

Specifed lots (sold and unsold) marked with a filled square ( ¦ ) not collected from Christie’s, 8 King Street, London SW1Y 6QT by 5.00 pm on the day of the sale will, at our option, be removed to Crown Fine Art (details below). Christie’s will inform you if the lot has been sent ofsite. If the lot is transferred to Crown Fine Art, it will be available for collection from 12.00 pm on the second business day following the sale. Please call Christie’s Client Service 24 hours in advance to book a collection time at Crown Fine Art. All collections from Crown Fine Art will be by prebooked appointment only.
These lots have been imported from outside of the UK for sale and placed under the Temporary Admission regime. Import VAT is payable at 5% on the hammer price. VAT at 20% will be added to the buyer’s premium but will not be shown separately on our invoice.
Sale Room Notice
The USA prohibits the purchase by US persons of Iranian-origin “works of conventional craftsmanship” such as carpets, textiles, decorative objects, and scientific instruments. The US sanctions apply to US persons regardless of the location of the transaction or the shipping intentions of the US person. For this reason, Christie’s will not accept bids by US persons on this lot. Non-US persons wishing to import this lot into the USA are advised that they will need to apply for an OFAC licence and that this can take many months to be granted.

Please note that these lots are being sold in Free Circulation and not under the Temporary Admission regime as stated in the printed catalogue.

Brought to you by

Behnaz Atighi Moghaddam
Behnaz Atighi Moghaddam Islamic Art

Check the condition report or get in touch for additional information about this

Condition Report

If you wish to view the condition report of this lot, please sign in to your account.

Sign in
View condition report

Lot Essay

This fragment, with no visible signs of fading, is a perfect example of just how brilliant the colours of Safavid carpets were when they first came off the looms. It consists of two main sections with smaller inclusions taken from the border of the same carpet. The broad cherry-red border is dominated by two entwined mid-blue strapwork arabesque bands that are punctuated with tonal green and brown palmettes that alternate in direction. Both are crisply drawn and are accentuated by sharp white outlines and are uncommonly woven in the same colour while most other examples from this group are woven in contrasting colours. Beneath these run thin vines dotted with small leaves, palmettes and flowers. A slightly larger fragment (248 x 135cm.) from the same carpet, formerly in a private Parisian collection, was purchased by the Keir Collection in 1970. That fragment displays a similar arrangement of border sections together with the original soft green scrolling vine inner guard stripe (F. Spuhler, Islamic Carpets and Textiles in the Keir Collection, London, 1978, pp.84-5, no.43).
Three smaller fragments of varying size are known, each bearing the same green inner guard stripe. One is in the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, (acc. no. T.30-1956) purchased from an Istanbul source; another was formerly with The Textile Gallery, London, now in a private Milanese collection; and a third fragment, formerly in the Wher collection, sold in these Rooms, on 3 May 2001 lot 75 and 10 October 2016, lot 188. The Wher fragment differs from the others in that it displays an energetic pattern of vinery taken from the top left indigo spandrel rather than the border. A slither of this same pattern can be seen on the Milanese fragment which also confirms that the carpet was woven with a green internal guard stripe and a golden yellow outer guard stripe which has been rewoven on our fragment (J. Eskenazi, Il tappeto orientale dal XV al XVIII secolo, London, 1981, pp.43-43, fig.3 & no.23). The exuberant drawing of the spandrel on the Wher fragment and the scale of the drawing is very similar to that in the ivory spandrel on the complete Rothschild Tabriz Medallion carpet, sold Christie’s London, 8 July 1999, lot 188.
The same green inner guard stripe present on the other fragments from this group is displayed on a carpet with a pale apricot field centred with a 16-point medallion that was shown by Yves Mikaeloff at the 14th Biennale Antiquaires, (HALI, Issue 41, Sept-Oct 1988, p.94).

More from Art of the Islamic and Indian Worlds including Oriental Rugs and Carpets

View All
View All