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AN IMPERIAL SILK AND METAL-THREAD CHINESE RUG
AN IMPERIAL SILK AND METAL-THREAD CHINESE RUG
AN IMPERIAL SILK AND METAL-THREAD CHINESE RUG
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AN IMPERIAL SILK AND METAL-THREAD CHINESE RUG
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Specifed lots (sold and unsold) marked with a fill… Read more
AN IMPERIAL SILK AND METAL-THREAD CHINESE RUG

LATE QING PERIOD, NORTH CHINA, CIRCA 1910

Details
AN IMPERIAL SILK AND METAL-THREAD CHINESE RUG
LATE QING PERIOD, NORTH CHINA, CIRCA 1910
The field and spandrels embroidered in 'gilt' metal-thread, with silk pile, localised light wear, overall good condition
8ft.4in. x 5ft.2in. (256cm. x 158cm.)
Special Notice

Specifed lots (sold and unsold) marked with a filled square ( ¦ ) not collected from Christie’s, 8 King Street, London SW1Y 6QT by 5.00 pm on the day of the sale will, at our option, be removed to Crown Fine Art (details below). Christie’s will inform you if the lot has been sent ofsite. If the lot is transferred to Crown Fine Art, it will be available for collection from 12.00 pm on the second business day following the sale. Please call Christie’s Client Service 24 hours in advance to book a collection time at Crown Fine Art. All collections from Crown Fine Art will be by prebooked appointment only.
These lots have been imported from outside of the UK for sale and placed under the Temporary Admission regime. Import VAT is payable at 5% on the hammer price. VAT at 20% will be added to the buyer’s premium but will not be shown separately on our invoice.

Brought to you by

Behnaz Atighi Moghaddam
Behnaz Atighi Moghaddam Head of Sale

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Lot Essay

The Chinese five character inscription reads: Jing ren gong bei yong (For use in the Palace of Great Benevolence)

This carpet is one of a group of so-called ‘palace’ carpets supposedly woven for the palaces of Beijing’s Forbidden City during the Qing dynasty. The inscription of this example states that it was woven to adorn the Palace of Great Benevolence - one of the 'Six Eastern Palaces' in the inner court of the Forbidden City. First built in 1420, this palace faces south within the complex and houses a stone screen inside the main entrance which is said to date from the Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368). Originally it was the residence for the emperors’ concubines in the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644). In the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911), Emperor Kangxi (r.1661-1722) was born and lived here temporarily. After that time, it was used by the emperors’ wives.
The elegant field design displaying mirrored pavilions flanked by swooping cranes and a partially submerged sea dragon within each spandrel is particularly close to another ‘palace’ carpet currently exhibited in ‘Kulun – The Elixir Carpets’ at the Museo Schneiberg, Turin and illustrated in HALI, no. 206, winter 2020, p. 107. Two further, slightly larger, carpets of comparable design were sold at Sotheby’s, London, 5 November 2008, lot 174 and 9 November 2011, lot 133.

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