AN EGYPTIAN GREEN SCHIST TORSO FOR PEDIAMUN
AN EGYPTIAN GREEN SCHIST TORSO FOR PEDIAMUN
AN EGYPTIAN GREEN SCHIST TORSO FOR PEDIAMUN
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AN EGYPTIAN GREEN SCHIST TORSO FOR PEDIAMUN
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OTHER PROPERTIES
A NUBIAN SERPENTINE SHABTI FOR KING SENKAMENISKEN

SUDAN, NAPATAN PERIOD, CIRCA 643-623 B.C.

Details
A NUBIAN SERPENTINE SHABTI FOR KING SENKAMENISKEN
SUDAN, NAPATAN PERIOD, CIRCA 643-623 B.C.
6 ¾ in. (17 cm.) high
Provenance
Excavated by George Andrew Reisner at Nuri pyramid 3, Sudan, during the Harvard University - Boston Museum of Fine Arts Expedition, in 1917 (field no. 17-2-1185).
Assigned to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston in the division of finds by the government of Sudan.
Holyoke Public Library, Holyoke, Massachussets, acquired from the above.
Property of the Holyoke Public Library Corporation, Grogan & Company, Boston, The December Auction, 4 December 1991, lot 754.
The Thalassic Collection, New York, acquired from the above.
Literature
P. Lacovara, et al., The Collector's Eye: Masterpieces of Egyptian Art from The Thalassic Collection, Ltd., p. 130, no. 78.
Exhibited
The Collector's Eye: Masterpieces of Egyptian Art from The Thalassic Collection, Michael C. Carlos Museum, Atlanta, 21 April 2001- 6 January 2002.

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Lot Essay

The Kushite pharaoh Senkamenisken was the grandson of Taharqa, the most renowned pharaoh of Dynasty XXV. He ruled a greatly reduced Nubian Kingdom following the Assyrian invasion of Egypt to the north. Like his grandfather, Senkamenisken commissioned a number of shabtis for his Pyramid tomb 3 at Nuri, in fact, more than any previous Nubian or Egyptian king. The 410 shabti figurines of Senkamanisken carved in serpentine to which this example belongs form a distinctive group among the total of 1,277 examples placed in his pyramid tomb at Nuri, excavated by G. A. Reisner in February 1917, see D. Dunham, The Royal Cemeteries of Kush, vol. II: Nuri, Boston, 1955, pl. CXL for a typology of Senkamenisken shabtis. Originally arranged in rows against the walls of the tomb, some examples bear the royal crook and flail, while one holds a pair of hoes in its hands. The distinctive Nubian double uraeus atop the nemes headdress distinguishes this version from Egyptian prototypes, while the full cheeks, buttonhole eyes, and straight smile reflect the portraiture of this ruler. Other types of shabti in faience from his tomb lack royal iconography, and are almost indistinguishable from non-royal examples. The inscription provides the titulary of the king within the context of the shabti spell, derived from Chapter 6 of the Book of the Dead.
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