Lot Content

Global notice COVID-19 Important notice
BERNARD BOUTET DE MONVEL (1881-1949)
BERNARD BOUTET DE MONVEL (1881-1949)
BERNARD BOUTET DE MONVEL (1881-1949)
1 More
BERNARD BOUTET DE MONVEL (1881-1949)
4 More
PROPERTY OF A PRIVATE COLLECTOR, UNITED KINGDOM
BERNARD BOUTET DE MONVEL (1881-1949)

Absolute painting: Luc surprised by a painting by Jean Metzinger; Luc in front of a painting by Jean Metzinger; Luc resolved to change his life

Details
BERNARD BOUTET DE MONVEL (1881-1949)
Absolute painting: Luc surprised by a painting by Jean Metzinger; Luc in front of a painting by Jean Metzinger; Luc resolved to change his life
pen and ink over pencil on paper
Luc surprised by a painting by Jean Metzinger: 7 3/8 x 9 3/8 in. (18.7 x 23.7 cm.)
Luc in front of a painting by Jean Metzinger: 7 3/8 x 5 3/8 in. (18.7 x 13.5 cm.)
Luc resolved to change his life: 7 3/8 x 5 3/8 in. (18.7 x 13.5 cm.)
(3)Drawn in 1920
Provenance
Silvye Boutet de Monel (the artist's daughter), by descent from the artist.
Private collection, France, by whom acquired from the above in the 1980s.
Private collection, United Kingdom.
Literature
H. Bidou, Absolute Painting, in 'Gazette du Bon Ton', vol. 1, 1920, p. 41 (illustrated).
Post Lot Text
Stéphane-Jacques Addade, member of the European Chamber of Art Experts and expert for the work of Bernard Boutet de Monvel, has confirmed the authenticity of these works.

Brought to you by

Annie Wallington
Annie Wallington Head of Day Sale

Lot Essay

The present group of three drawings imagine the character ‘Luc’ visiting the 1919 Jean Metzinger exhibition, presented by Léonce Rosenberg at the Galerie de l'Effort moderne, located in Rue de La Baume in Paris. The illustrations were published in the Gazette du Bon Ton (volume I, 1920, p. 41) to accompany the article by Henri Bidou entitled: 'Absolute painting'.

In the story Luc studies each canvas closely, and greatly admires Metzinger’s technique and rigorous compositions. Luc meets an old man who describes the work as ‘la peinture absolue’. He points out to Luc that Metzinger is not painting the thing but the idea of the thing, and that one must not copy, but paint the essence of things ('Il ne faut pas copier. Monsieur, il fait peindre l'essence même des êtres, et leur prototype éternel.’). Luc replies that he used to think this way in his youth, but then he became an Impressionist, and it is for this reason that his soul is not pure, unlike that of Metzinger. Luc departs the gallery with his vision of the universe altered, viewing everything he sees on the street in terms of lines, angles and geometry, and becomes a Cubist.

More from Impressionist and Modern Art Day and Works on Paper Sale

View All
View All