A PAIR OF GILTWOOD EAGLE CONSOLE TABLES
A PAIR OF GILTWOOD EAGLE CONSOLE TABLES
A PAIR OF GILTWOOD EAGLE CONSOLE TABLES
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A PAIR OF GILTWOOD EAGLE CONSOLE TABLES
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Specified lots (sold and unsold) marked with a fil… Read more
A PAIR OF GILTWOOD EAGLE CONSOLE TABLES

BY JENSEN GILDERS, MODERN, IN THE MANNER OF FRANCIS BRODIE

Details
A PAIR OF GILTWOOD EAGLE CONSOLE TABLES
BY JENSEN GILDERS, MODERN, IN THE MANNER OF FRANCIS BRODIE
Each rectangular brêche violette marble top above a Vitruvian scroll frieze supported by a displayed eagle on a rock-work base, the moulded pedestal base with foliate carving
Each 33 ¾ in. (81.5 cm.) high; 32 in. (81 cm.) wide; 15 ¼ in. (39.5 cm.) deep
Provenance
Supplied by Jensen Gilders, April 2010.
Special notice

Specified lots (sold and unsold) marked with a filled square not collected from Christie’s, 8 King Street, London SW1Y 6QT by 5.00pm on the day of the sale will, at our option, be removed to Crozier Park Royal (details below). Christie’s will inform you if the lot has been sent offsite. If the lot is transferred to Crozier Park Royal, it will be available for collection on the third business day after the sale. Please call Christie’s Client Service 24 hours in advance to book a collection time at Crozier Park Royal. All collections from Crozier Park Royal will be by pre-booked appointment only. Tel: +44 (0)20 7839 9060 Email: cscollectionsuk@christies.com. If the lot remains at Christie’s, 8 King Street, it will be available for collection on any working day (not weekends) from 9.00am to 5.00pm

Brought to you by

Benedict Winter
Benedict Winter Associate Director, Specialist

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Lot Essay

This pair of 'Jupiter' eagle console tables, appropriate for a 'Roman' banqueting hall, recalls the myth Ovid's Metamorphoses of the shepherd Ganymede who was borne aloft by an eagle to serve as Jupiter's attendant at the banquet of the Gods. The pattern may have been invented by Lord Burlington's protégé, the artist architect William Kent (d. 1748), who provided Roman eagles in his illustrations for Alexander Pope's 1725 translation of Homer's Odyssey.

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