Lot Content

Global notice COVID-19 Important notice
A GRANITE PILLAR WITH A YAKSHA AND SNAKES
A GRANITE PILLAR WITH A YAKSHA AND SNAKES
1 More
PROPERTY FROM THE JAMES AND MARILYNN ALSDORF COLLECTION
A GRANITE PILLAR WITH A YAKSHA AND SNAKES

SOUTH INDIA, KARNATAKA, 13TH-14TH CENTURY

Details
A GRANITE PILLAR WITH A YAKSHA AND SNAKES
SOUTH INDIA, KARNATAKA, 13TH-14TH CENTURY
40 in. (101.6 cm.) high
Provenance
Christie's London, 29 October 1981, lot 309.
The James and Marilynn Alsdorf Collection, Chicago.
Literature
P. Pal, A Collecting Odyssey: Indian, Himalayan, and Southeast Asian Art from the James and Marilynn Alsdorf Collection, Chicago, 1997, pp. 269, cat. no. 367.
Exhibited
The Art Institute of Chicago, “A Collecting Odyssey: Indian, Himalayan, and Southeast Asian Art from the James and Marilynn Alsdorf Collection,” 2 August-26 October 1997, cat. no. 367.

Brought to you by

Tristan Bruck
Tristan Bruck Specialist, Head of Sale

Check the condition report or get in touch for additional information about this

Condition report

If you wish to view the condition report of this lot, please sign in to your account.

Sign in
View condition report

Lot Essay


Following the fall of the Chola empire, later schools under the Hoysalas rejected the restraint and simplicity of their predecessors, adopting a more ornate approach to their sculptures. Both the nobility and affluent citizenry of the Hoysala kingdom were generous patrons of the arts, and many of their temples are among the most luxuriant ornate stone structures on the subcontinent. The sculpture of this period was defined by exuberant ornamentation, incorporating decorative motifs and designs to frame the representation of deities.
The veneration of serpents is still prevalent in India and works such as the present lot are found commonly among the sculpture of Karnataka, where the motif was particularly popular. While serpents were worshipped for protection from their deadly bite, they were also implored for prosperity and progeny. The reptiles here are not rendered in their naturalistic form but rather used to adorn the sides of the pillar, taking the form of the exaggerated ornamentation that was characteristic of this period.

More from Indian, Himalayan & Southeast Asian Works of Art

View All
View All