Upcoming Auctions and Events

Global notice COVID-19 Important notice
A SILK BATTLE FLAG
These lots have been imported from outside of the … Read more
A SILK BATTLE FLAG

OTTOMAN TURKEY, DATED AH 1[3]11/1893-4 AD

Details
A SILK BATTLE FLAG
OTTOMAN TURKEY, DATED AH 1[3]11/1893-4 AD
Comprising three joined panels, the crimson silk ground woven with 9ll. of cream thuluth arranged in three panels, dated lower left, with silver gilt thread and polychrome silk fringes, minor staining, lined
59 1/8 x 63 ¾in. (150 x 162cm.)
Special notice

These lots have been imported from outside of the UK for sale and placed under the Temporary Admission regime. Import VAT is payable at 5% on the hammer price. VAT at 20% will be added to the buyer’s premium but will not be shown separately on our invoice.

Brought to you by

Behnaz Atighi Moghaddam
Behnaz Atighi Moghaddam Head of Sale

Check the condition report or get in touch for additional information about this

Condition report

If you wish to view the condition report of this lot, please sign in to your account.

Sign in
View condition report

Lot Essay

The present lot is an Ottoman regimental standard, sancak, very possibly captured at the Ottoman defeat at the Battle of Al Wajbah in 1893 by Qatari forces. Although the battle did not result in Qatar’s full independence, the victory over Ottoman forces is considered a defining moment in the establishment of the modern state of Qatar and the waning of Ottoman rule in the Gulf.

It was common practice for Ottoman regiments to carry such standards around the turn of the 20th century which is well supported by photographic evidence, with such standards carried by the Ottoman Turkish army in the First World War (Australian War Memorial: RELAWM15159). A photograph shows a very similar standard was presented to the defenders of Gaza, who repulsed the first British attach in 1917 (Library of Congress, LC-DIG-ppmsca-13709-00116). A section of a similar panel from the last quarter of the 19th century, this time in green, is in the Sakip Sabanci Museum collection..

More from Art of the Islamic and Indian Worlds Including Oriental Rugs and Carpets

View All
View All