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CIRCLE OF PIERRE PUGET (MARSEILLE 1620-1694 MARSEILLE), LATE 17TH CENTURY
CIRCLE OF PIERRE PUGET (MARSEILLE 1620-1694 MARSEILLE), LATE 17TH CENTURY
CIRCLE OF PIERRE PUGET (MARSEILLE 1620-1694 MARSEILLE), LATE 17TH CENTURY
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CIRCLE OF PIERRE PUGET (MARSEILLE 1620-1694 MARSEILLE), LATE 17TH CENTURY
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Please note that at our discretion some lots may b… Read more
CIRCLE OF PIERRE PUGET (MARSEILLE 1620-1694 MARSEILLE), LATE 17TH CENTURY

Milo of Croton

Details
CIRCLE OF PIERRE PUGET (MARSEILLE 1620-1694 MARSEILLE), LATE 17TH CENTURY
Milo of Croton
marble group; on an integrally carved base
44 1⁄2 in. (113 cm.) high
Literature
COMPARATIVE LITERATURE:
M.-P. Vial et al, Pierre Puget Peintre, Sculpteur, Architecte 1620-1694, Marseilles, 1994.
J.-R. Gaborit et al, Sculpture Française, II, Renaissance et Temps Modernes, Paris, 1998, I, pp. 354 and 366, II, p. 554.
Special notice

Please note that at our discretion some lots may be moved immediately after the sale to our storage facility at Momart Logistics Warehouse: Units 9-12, E10 Enterprise Park, Argall Way, Leyton, London E10 7DQ. At King Street lots are available for collection on any weekday, 9.00 am to 4.30 pm. Collection from Momart is strictly by appointment only. We advise that you inform the sale administrator at least 48 hours in advance of collection so that they can arrange with Momart. However, if you need to contact Momart directly: Tel: +44 (0)20 7426 3000 email: pcandauctionteam@momart.co.uk.
These lots have been imported from outside of the UK for sale and placed under the Temporary Admission regime. Import VAT is payable at 5% on the hammer price. VAT at 20% will be added to the buyer’s premium but will not be shown separately on our invoice.

Brought to you by

Clementine Sinclair
Clementine Sinclair Specialist, Head of Evening Sale

Lot Essay

Although often mistaken for a mythological figure, Milo of Croton was, in fact, a Greek wrestler living in the 6th century BC, who is also credited with having led his fellow citizens to military victory over the neighbouring city of Sybaris in 510 BC. Today he is best known for the story surrounding his death, which relates that when showing his great strength by trying to tear apart a tree, his hand became stuck and he was devoured by a lion. He became a popular allegorical figure in literature and art as he was said to represent the folly of brute strength without wisdom.
In sculpture, the scene was depicted by several artists including Etienne-Maurice Falconet (1716-1791), Edmé Dumont (1720-1775) and Pierre Puget (1620-1694; all three now Louvre, Paris, see Gaborit, locs. cit.). The marble group executed by the latter was carved from a colossal block of marble originally delivered to Toulon for Puget’s use in 1670, although the finished group was not delivered to Versailles until 1683. Puget’s marble is a strongly diagonal composition and betrays some of the baroque influences the sculptor absorbed during prolonged stays in Rome and Genoa. Although the present marble group is somewhat more spiral in its composition, it still shares many stylistic similarities with Puget’s marble including the dynamic sense of struggle and the somewhat anthropomorphic lion who savagely tears at the hero with his teeth and claws. The sense of drama is heightened by the twisting pose of Milo in the lot offered here, and both marbles share the distinctive head tilted back in anguish with the square-shaped face and tightly curled hair.

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