A GERMAN GOLD-MOUNTED HARDSTONE BONBONNIERE
A GERMAN GOLD-MOUNTED HARDSTONE BONBONNIERE
A GERMAN GOLD-MOUNTED HARDSTONE BONBONNIERE
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This lot has been imported from outside of the UK … Read more GERMAN BOXES The manufacture of gold boxes in Germany was for a long time considered to be a relatively small operation, consisting mainly of gold-mounted hardstone boxes, large shaped rectangular gold boxes chased and embossed with rococo motifs or boxes applied with carved ivory and mother-of-pearl, produced mainly in Berlin and Dresden. A minority were enamelled en plein enriched with diamond-set scrolling thumbpieces modelled on French examples.A study led by the German silver academic Lorenz Selig has revealed the importance of Hanau as a key centre of production of gold boxes which has resulted in many boxes, often with poinçons de prestige, to be re-attributed to Hanau makers. The gold box industry in Hanau flourished from the late 1730s and by the 1760s the guild, the Gesellschaft der Neu-Hanauer Bijoutiers, introduced its own regulations, which primarily included the 18-carat standard giving the Hanau makers, in common with Geneva, an advantage over Paris goldsmiths. Quality also rose, helped by the opening of the Hanau Drawing Academy, which trained young craftsmen in the art of drawing and also engraving. Most significantly it was the contract passed with Etienne Flamant in 1773 that boosted production. Flamant, a guillocheur from Geneva, who owned a lathe-turning machine of his own invention, contracted with five Hanau bijouterie manufacturers to supply boxes: the Freres Toussaint (lot 17), the Freres Souchay, Daniel Marchand, Esaias Obicker and Esaias Fernau (lot 19). Their work, as well as that of many still unnamed Hanau goldsmiths, was exceptional due to the quality and inventiveness of their enamelling as well as the engine-turning. Many of these Hanau goldsmiths, well represented in this collection, went on to create boxes of a standard comparable to Paris examples, which fooled collectors and specialists alike for many years.
A GERMAN GOLD-MOUNTED HARDSTONE BONBONNIERE

PROBABLY HANAU, WITH SPURIOUS MAKER'S MARK AND THE CHARGE MARKS OF ELOY BRICHARD AND ETIENNE SOMFROYE, 1756-1762 AND TWO FRENCH POST-1893 IMPORT MARKS FOR GOLD

Details
A GERMAN GOLD-MOUNTED HARDSTONE BONBONNIERE
PROBABLY HANAU, WITH SPURIOUS MAKER'S MARK AND THE CHARGE MARKS OF ELOY BRICHARD AND ETIENNE SOMFROYE, 1756-1762 AND TWO FRENCH POST-1893 IMPORT MARKS FOR GOLD
Circular box set with panels of smokey quartz mounted en cage within chased gold mounts, the cover and sides applied with gold cagework of scrolling ribbon tied foliage, flowers and musical instruments, the cover set with an oval enamel portrait miniature, in the manner of Jean Petitot (1607-1691), of Anne of Austria (1601-1666), on copper, within a diamond-set silver-mounted frame
2 7⁄8 in. (74 mm.) diameter
Special notice
This lot has been imported from outside of the UK for sale and placed under the Temporary Admission regime. Import VAT is payable at 5% on the hammer price. VAT at 20% will be added to the buyer’s premium but will not be shown separately on our invoice.

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Matilda Burn
Matilda Burn Specialist, Head of Department

Lot Essay


Anne of Austria (1601-1666), daughter of King Philip III of Spain and Margaret of Styria, was the sister of King Philip IV of Spain. She was married to King Louis XIII of France in 1615. Despite his lack of interest in his wife, she finally gave birth to the future King Louis XIV in 1638. Her frivolous character caused gossip, particularly concerning the love affair and even a later secret 'private' marriage with Prime Minister Cardinal Mazarin. She was officially regent for her son 1643-1651 but continued to rule until 1661 when she retired to the convent of Val de Grâce.

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