A CHIPPENDALE CARVED MAHOGANY DRESSING TABLE
A CHIPPENDALE CARVED MAHOGANY DRESSING TABLE
A CHIPPENDALE CARVED MAHOGANY DRESSING TABLE
A CHIPPENDALE CARVED MAHOGANY DRESSING TABLE
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Please note this lot will be moved to Christie’s F… Read more PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF MR. AND MRS. PETER G. TERIAN
A CHIPPENDALE CARVED MAHOGANY DRESSING TABLE

THE CARVING ATTRIBUTED TO THE CRAFTSMAN KNOWN AS ‘SPIKE,’ PHILADELPHIA, 1760-1775 

Details
A CHIPPENDALE CARVED MAHOGANY DRESSING TABLE
THE CARVING ATTRIBUTED TO THE CRAFTSMAN KNOWN AS ‘SPIKE,’ PHILADELPHIA, 1760-1775 
31 in. high, 36 1⁄4 in. wide, 20 1⁄4 in. deep
Provenance
Colonial Williamsburg, Williamsburg, Virginia
Sotheby’s, New York, 17-18 January 2002, lot 405
Special notice

Please note this lot will be moved to Christie’s Fine Art Storage Services (CFASS in Red Hook, Brooklyn) at 5pm on the last day of the sale. Lots may not be collected during the day of their move to Christie’s Fine Art Storage Services. Please consult the Lot Collection Notice for collection information. This sheet is available from the Bidder Registration staff, Purchaser Payments or the Packing Desk and will be sent with your invoice.

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Lot Essay


Distinguished by the wide gouge cuts that extend through the tips of the acanthus leaves, the carving on this dressing table can be attributed to an unnamed carver identified and nicknamed “Spike” by Alan Miller and Luke Beckerdite. Miller has described this craftsman as “one of the important Philadelphia carvers of the 1760s and early 1770s” and examples such as the Lawrence high chest at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Wistar desk-and-bookcase at the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Gratz dressing table at Winterthur Museum demonstrate his virtuosity and artistic range. His talents were certainly held in high regard by his fellow woodworkers as his work appears on forms made in the shops of leading cabinetmakers Benjamin Randolph and Henry Cliffton and alongside or in close association with the work of eminent carvers such as the “Garvan high chest” carver, Hercules Courtenay and John Pollard. See Alan Miller, catalogue entry, in Clement E. Conger and A.W. Rollins, Treasures of State: Fine and Decorative Arts in the Diplomatic Reception Rooms of the US Department of State (New York, 1991), cat. 28.

A dressing table with closely related shell ornament by the same carver was probably made in the same shop as that offered here. Both tables feature a front skirt centered by a shallow arch and flanked by inward-facing scrolls and robustly carved feet with particularly pronounced claws (see Sotheby’s, New York, 26 January 2013, lot 411).
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