A KURDISH LOOPED PILE TEXTILE
A KURDISH LOOPED PILE TEXTILE
A KURDISH LOOPED PILE TEXTILE
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A KURDISH LOOPED PILE TEXTILE
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Specifed lots (sold and unsold) marked with a fill… Read more
A KURDISH LOOPED PILE TEXTILE

AZERBAIJAN, EARLY 20TH CENTURY

Details
A KURDISH LOOPED PILE TEXTILE
AZERBAIJAN, EARLY 20TH CENTURY
Comprising two joined panels, a spot of repiling, overall very good condition
5ft.7in. x 3ft.5in. (172cm. x 105cm.)
Special notice

Specifed lots (sold and unsold) marked with a filled square not collected from Christie’s, 8 King Street, London SW1Y 6QT by 5.00 pm on the day of the sale will, at our option, be removed to Crown Fine Art (details below). Christie’s will inform you if the lot has been sent ofsite. If the lot is transferred to Crown Fine Art, it will be available for collection from 12.00 pm on the second business day following the sale. Please call Christie’s Client Service 24 hours in advance to book a collection time at Crown Fine Art. All collections from Crown Fine Art will be by prebooked appointment only.
This lot has been imported from outside of the UK for sale and placed under the Temporary Admission regime. Import VAT is payable at 5% on the hammer price. VAT at 20% will be added to the buyer’s premium but will not be shown separately on our invoice.

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Barney Bartlett
Barney Bartlett Cataloguer

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Lot Essay


John Wertime notes that the earliest type of pile was likely based upon loops with examples in linen dating back as early as circa 2000 BC. The simplicity of the technique led to widespread use and continued up until the last century (John Wertime, 'Woven Minimalism', HALI, no.196, 2018, pp.85-86). Like the present rug, 20th century examples in looped pile tend towards mimimalist, geometric designs, see, for example a monochromatic Anatolian looped pile rug (Wertime, op.cit., p.84, fig.8). Slightly more ambitious in its design, the bold lozenges here fit into a similar vocabulary as kilims such as one published in Kurt Zipper and Claudia Fritzsche, Orienteppiche: Band III Anatolische Teppiche, Germany, 1977, p.159, no. 167.

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